Communicating Via Tumblr And .gifs: The whatshouldwecallme Trend

Today's post comes to us from Laura, a soon-to-be sophomore at NYU who has noticed a particular trend among her generation. They're using non-traditional media for communication. When text messaging, social media, and the rest isn't enough, they'll invent their own ways to connect, which is what happened when two law students on opposite ends of the country wanted a better way to keep in touch — so they turned to Tumblr and animated .gifs. Laura explains their story, which became a cultural phenomenon, below...

Communicating Via Tumblr And .gifs: The whatshouldwecallme Trend

The multitude of ways our generation communicates today has been a topic of fascination for years now in the wake of new technologies that range from texting to Skype chats. These methods are simple, direct, and great for keeping in touch with friends or family that could be located anywhere in the world. But for two best friends attending law schools on different coasts of the country, the available communication tools weren’t enough.

The law school ladies, who insist upon staying anonymous to the public, wanted to find a way to stay in touch and entertain each other throughout the day. They found that they could create their own funny, often self-deprecating private jokes or tidbits about their lives using captioned .gifs — short, soundless moving image clips from TV or movies. The captions, which they wrote themselves either before or after finding the appropriate .gif, truly makes the joke, since it puts the unrelated content of the image into the context of their point. For example, a .gif clip from the evening news of a culprit running away becomes the metaphor for “when my sister tries to leave the house wearing my clothes.”

The two got a laugh from these Tumblr exchanges, naming it


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “The issue I most care about during this presidential election is how we are going to resolve this massive student loan problem.”—Male, 23, PA

Hermés is conforming to the new definition of luxury by being more accessible to young, “fashion-obsessed” consumers. The brand has launched a “colorfully-designed” and Instagrammable space stocked with entry-level pieces—including their slimmer Twilly scarf that is priced around $160—at Nordstrom’s Seattle flagship. To allow the consumer the ability “to engage and have fun and try things on without the intimidation,” products are out in the open on “moveable hooks on magnetized walls” instead of behind glass. (Racked)

Millennial entrepreneurs are leading the way for digital advertising. A Magisto survey on Millennial small to medium-sized business owners, revealed that they are spending more than half of their marketing budget on digital media, and are three times more likely than Boomers to spend the majority of their media budget on digital advertising. Social media and video are the main focus for Millennial marketers: 68% say they depend on social media ads to spread brand awareness, 60% leverage social media ads to create revenue, and 88% currently use or want to use video for digital advertising. (Business Wire

A new chatbot wants to monitor kids’ online activity, and educate them as well. Oyoty, targeted for children ages 12 and under, is a friendly bot that links itself to social media accounts and keeps watch of public postings. When Oyoty flags content for a particular issue—for example, a provocative selfie or sharing of personal data—it starts a two-way conversation with the child and explains why they should think twice before posting. To fulfill the aim of educating and empowering children when it comes to online safety, the act of editing or deleting the content is left to the child to execute. (TechCrunch

The digital-native generation is thinking twice before sharing their personal data. A LexisNexis survey on Millennials in the U.S., U.K., Germany, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Mexico, and Brazil, found that young consumers are hesitant to share their personal data, presenting an issue for businesses who “need to gather critical data for better fraud prevention.” In the U.S. about two-thirds of Millennials are worried about identity theft and data breaches—which was “surprisingly lower than most of their global counterparts, of whom more than 75 percent are concerned.” (FinextraPYMNTS

Finance publication Barron’s has launched a Millennial-focused site to hook in the next generation of investors. With a focus on quick daily stock analysis, video, and personal finance stories, Barron’s Next aims to give young consumers “an easy way to understand the economy and begin to take their first steps as investors.” Like S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average, Barron’s Next also offers Next 50—a snapshot of stocks from brands that “young consumers love,” like Urban Outfitters and Tesla. (Digiday)  

Quote of the Day: “For Halloween I’m dressing up as Erlich Bachman from the HBO show Silicon Valley.”—Male, 24, IN

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