Brands Playing With Snap Spectacles Marketing

Spectacles are a hot item, still available exclusively through pop-up bots, but some brands are finding ways to turn the new tech a marketing toy...

Last May, Snap (formerly Snapchat) CEO Evan Spiegel started laying the groundwork for the brand’s not-yet-announced Spectacles, declaring that Snap is a “camera company.” He explained that though messaging and content are part of the app, the camera is the focus because “[t]he thing that feeds a social network is content.” Today, that statement lives on Snap’s site, where visitors learn, “We believe that reinventing the camera represents our greatest opportunity to improve the way people live and communicate. Our products empower people to express themselves, live in the moment, learn about the world, and have fun together.” Snapchat Spectacles are currently the product that best encapsulated this mission, allowing wearers to capture what they’re doing and broadcast it in real time. The camera wearable is not even available in stores yet, but has earned the brand serious buzz—both because of how they’ve been sold so far and their potential to be an AR game-changer.  

Since being introduced in September, the brand has eschewed making Spectacles available in a traditional store in favor of pop-ups that are all about engaging visitors in a unique way. The glasses are currently sold through Snapbots—vending machines that appear for one day only in some locations revealed 24 hours in advance through an online map. The modern vending machines are now known for their epically long lines, thanks to huge consumer demand and the allure of a unique experience. But the fact that Snap Inc. has filed for a public IPO has some hoping that Spectacles will be available to the mainstream soon, and their filing included plans to “expand distribution” of…


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