Brands Playing With Snap Spectacles Marketing

Spectacles are a hot item, still available exclusively through pop-up bots, but some brands are finding ways to turn the new tech a marketing toy...

Last May, Snap (formerly Snapchat) CEO Evan Spiegel started laying the groundwork for the brand’s not-yet-announced Spectacles, declaring that Snap is a “camera company.” He explained that though messaging and content are part of the app, the camera is the focus because “[t]he thing that feeds a social network is content.” Today, that statement lives on Snap’s site, where visitors learn, “We believe that reinventing the camera represents our greatest opportunity to improve the way people live and communicate. Our products empower people to express themselves, live in the moment, learn about the world, and have fun together.” Snapchat Spectacles are currently the product that best encapsulated this mission, allowing wearers to capture what they’re doing and broadcast it in real time. The camera wearable is not even available in stores yet, but has earned the brand serious buzz—both because of how they’ve been sold so far and their potential to be an AR game-changer.  

Since being introduced in September, the brand has eschewed making Spectacles available in a traditional store in favor of pop-ups that are all about engaging visitors in a unique way. The glasses are currently sold through Snapbots—vending machines that appear for one day only in some locations revealed 24 hours in advance through an online map. The modern vending machines are now known for their epically long lines, thanks to huge consumer demand and the allure of a unique experience. But the fact that Snap Inc. has filed for a public IPO has some hoping that Spectacles will be available to the mainstream soon, and their filing included plans to “expand distribution” of…

 
 

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Over half of Millennials believe “money can buy happiness.” Fifty-three percent of 22-39-year-olds believe the more money you have, the happier you are, compared to 38% of Americans overall, according to Mintel. The research also shows Millennials are optimists: a little over half are confident in their financial futures, although nearly a third consider paying off credit card bills their greatest financial challenge. Considering the Ypulse financial tracker shows 59% of 18-34-year-olds have debt, we’re not surprised. (MediaPost)

Mickey Mouse Club is coming back for a new generation, and they know just where to find them: social media. Disney announced at Vidcon that the new rendition of the variety show will be released in snackable snippets on social media only. The show will search for future stars with little to no social followings, but big, undiscovered talents, such as choreography and songwriting. Disney is winning out with Millennials and this nostalgic hit should be right on brand; you can see it at the end of August on the Oh My Disney Facebook channel. (THR)

Summer camp costs more than ever before, and some parents are paying big bucks for their children to rough it. Sleepaway camps cost an average of $768 a week, up from $397 in 2005, for often less-than-luxe accommodations. Affluent parents who want their kids to “just be normal” are sending them to camps that can cost $20,000 for basic room and board that “smells a little mildewy,” where kids do their own laundry, clean their rooms, have roommates, and engage in typical camp activities—macaroni art, anyone? (MarketWatch)

Taco Bell has built brand love and a loyal fan following across digital. Their record-breaking giant taco head Snapchat lenswas just the beginning of their successful social marketing strategy, which involves treating each platform differently. The latest example is their YouTube series, Taco Tales, which includes 40 pieces of long-form content catered to their fans. They’ve accrued 10.5 million Facebook fans, 1.85 million Twitter followers, and 60,000 YouTube subscribers with their “wacky,” authentic brand voice in an effort to not just people-please, but to be themselves—which may be why they’re one of young adults’ favorite fast food restaurants.

(The Drum)

More evidence that Millennials still love analog books: They’re the most likely generation to use public libraries, according to a Pew Research Report. More than half of 18-35-year-olds have frequented a public library in the last twelve months, compared to 45% of Gen X, 43% of Boomers, and 36% of Silents. University libraries were specifically not counted, so being college-aged isn’t giving them any advantage, either. The finding goes hand in hand with Ypulse data that shows reading is 13-34-year-olds’ biggest hobby. 

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