Author Spotlight: 'Going Bovine' By Libba Bray

Today’s Author Spotlight is on Libba Bray who joins us  on the blog tour for her latest novel Going Bovine. A world away from the Gemma Doyle trilogy, Libba introduces us to Cameron, a 16-year-old boy diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, aka Mad Cow Disease, and facing certain death. Or is he? A cure and a chance to save the world (long story) may just lie with a punk rock angel named Dulcie if he chooses to accept her mission and set out with his dwarf friend Gonzo. Then again. it all might just be a hallucination conjured up by his disease-riddled mind. Either way (no spoilers here) it’s a crazy, thoroughly enjoyable ride.

Going Bovine is out in book stores now, but we’re giving away a free copy to the first three commenters who share a memory from their teen years where humor helped you get through a difficult time.

going+bovineYpulse: How in the world did the idea for Going Bovine come to you?

Libba Bray: I know! Nutty, right? (pause)
You want an answer. Crap. Well, it starts as most books do, with a random assortment of ideas, memories, questions, and too much coffee. Years ago, my mother told me about a man in our hometown who had contracted the human variant of mad cow disease. He saw hallucinations, one of which was a wall of flames that would pop up into his field of vision. I was horrified by that, horrified by the idea of going crazy, of never really knowing what was real or not. And then I thought, “Well, how do we ever really know what’s real or not?” As my son asked, “How do we know if we’re really living our lives or if this is somebody’s dream?” Great question. We don’t know. And that got me to thinking about the nature of existence and all the big questions: Why are we here? Where do we go next? What really matters? How do we assign meaning to our…


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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “This holiday, I’m giving someone a hoverboard.” –Male, 19, CA

Yesterday’s Cyber Monday broke records and holiday shopping is increasingly moving online—especially for Millennials. So it only makes sense for brands targeting young consumers to focus more of their holiday marketing efforts on digital. J.Crew and American Girl are both betting big on social campaigns this season, with J.Crew creating shoppable Instagram ads and a digital gift guide, and American Girl running multiple campaigns on Facebook and Instagram this December. (Adweek)

Since we first wrote about the best dressed generation, the trend of mini-fashionistas earning Instagram fame has only continued and grown. Some parents of these pint-sized digital celebrities, who the Times has dubbed “Instamoms,” work with brands to feature clothing and products in post in exchange for payment. While the kids are undoubtedly adorable, one consulted psychologist compares the practice to the “pageant world.” (NYTimes)

Spotify has released their year in review results, and Millennial artists are ruling the streaming waves. Drake was the most streamed artist of the year, Rihanna was the most streamed female artist, Justin Beiber received the most streams in a single day, and The Weeknd had the most streamed album. One important note: Taylor Swift and Adele are not included in the ranking because they do not make their music available on the service. (The Verge)

Over thirty percent of Millennials see credit cards as “old school,” according to PayPal’s shopping research. This attitude could be because of their increasing affinity towards mobile and digital payments, and PayPal declares that this means, “’Millennials want credit that is as digitally native as they are.’” The e-pay brand also found that Millennials are more likely than any other generation to say they are more likely to trust companies that are tech-based. (Marketingland)

Cereal was once as much a part of childhood as Saturdaymorning cartoons, but the boxed breakfast is on the decline with children, and Millennials. Young consumers have been turning to lower sugar, portable food options like Greek yogurt, and “kids today don’t identify with cereal as much as the older generations once did.” Brands are pivoting marketing and products to adjust to the shift, and Kellogg has experimented with playing on Millennials’ nostalgia to get them back in the cereal aisle. (The Atlantic)

Quote of the Day: “This holiday season, I’m buying myself a GoPro.” –Male, 28, MI

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