Author Spotlight: 'Going Bovine' By Libba Bray

Today’s Author Spotlight is on Libba Bray who joins us  on the blog tour for her latest novel Going Bovine. A world away from the Gemma Doyle trilogy, Libba introduces us to Cameron, a 16-year-old boy diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, aka Mad Cow Disease, and facing certain death. Or is he? A cure and a chance to save the world (long story) may just lie with a punk rock angel named Dulcie if he chooses to accept her mission and set out with his dwarf friend Gonzo. Then again. it all might just be a hallucination conjured up by his disease-riddled mind. Either way (no spoilers here) it’s a crazy, thoroughly enjoyable ride.

Going Bovine is out in book stores now, but we’re giving away a free copy to the first three commenters who share a memory from their teen years where humor helped you get through a difficult time.

going+bovineYpulse: How in the world did the idea for Going Bovine come to you?

Libba Bray: I know! Nutty, right? (pause)
Oh.
You want an answer. Crap. Well, it starts as most books do, with a random assortment of ideas, memories, questions, and too much coffee. Years ago, my mother told me about a man in our hometown who had contracted the human variant of mad cow disease. He saw hallucinations, one of which was a wall of flames that would pop up into his field of vision. I was horrified by that, horrified by the idea of going crazy, of never really knowing what was real or not. And then I thought, “Well, how do we ever really know what’s real or not?” As my son asked, “How do we know if we’re really living our lives or if this is somebody’s dream?” Great question. We don’t know. And that got me to thinking about the nature of existence and all the big questions: Why are we here? Where do we go next? What really matters? How do we assign meaning to our…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I like to keep updated about what’s happening in the world, but not out of obligation, to talk [about it with] someone else or for entertainment.” – Female, 25, MA

“Sexts, hugs, and rock ‘n roll.” That’s how BuzzFeed describes DigiTour, an 18-city bus tour bringing some of the most popular teens on social media to meet crowds of their screaming fans around the country this summer. Most of the digital celebrities involved don’t have traditional talent—but that doesn’t seem to matter. In 2014 the tour sold 120,000 tickets for 60 shows, and they are set to double that number this year. DigiTour could be the “clearest sign yet that the entertainment industry’s star-making apparatus is being turned upside down.” (A topic we explored in depth in our hot-off-the presses trend report.) (BuzzFeed)

As if that wasn’t evidence enough that young consumers are not like you…A recent poll on the American Dream revealed that Millennials’ views of success in America are not the same as older generations. Respondents under 30-year-olds were the most likely to say that having a job that paid well was crucial to attaining the American Dream (47%), and placed more importance on luxury items—travel and the latest technology—than other age groups (32%). (CNN Money)

Are you ready for some fireworks? Fourth of July spending is reportedly up, and 64.4% of consumers plan to celebrate the day. When we surveyed 13-32-year-olds about their plans, only 8% said they weren’t planning to celebrate. We also found that spending for Independence Day shows signs of increasing among Millennials and teens. In 2014 they estimated they would spend an average of $70.21—this year that number went up to $85.56. (MediaPost)

Watching and sharing video content is huge part of Millennials and teens’ online activity—and their mobile behavior. According to Ypulse’s February monthly survey, 50% of 13-32-year-olds say they watch videos on their phones once a day or more. So it makes sense that apps focused on viral video content are a growing category. Minute is a startup video app “for the ADD generation.” The platform finds the most viral parts of online video and turns them into short “Vine-like” clips. (TechCrunch)

Inclusion is becoming increasingly important to young consumers, and the Girl Scouts has made their stance on being an inclusive organization clear this week. The group returned a $100,000 donation after being told the money could not be used to support transgendered girls. To make up the funds, they set up an IndieGogo campaign on Monday, and launched a #ForEVERYGirl campaign to get the message out. The crowdfunding page has raised over $300,000 in three days. (Fast Company)

Want to know more about how young consumers will be spending for the holiday? Our 4th of July Infographic Snapshot has been opened to all our readers—you can click through to see a break down of the red, white, blue, and green in our coverage of what Millennials & teens are buying, and doing, for Independence Day this year. 83% of 14-32-year-olds say they are proud to be an American, and they’re planning to celebrate. Happy 4th everyone! 

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