ABC Family Stars Discuss Reaching Millennial Viewers And The Evolving Relationship With Fans

Ask most female Millennials about their favorite TV channels and ABC Family will likely top their list. According to Ypulse research, it’s the most popular network among Gen Y. Fully 63% of high school girls say they tune into the network regularly, as do 47% of college age females. These stats should come as no surprise considering that the channel has captivating yet relatable programming, and it consistently attracts teens as well as twentysomethings. ABC Family also understands the evolving needs of fans and not only how to reach young viewers, but also how to interact with them.

We attended the network’s 25 Days of Christmas Winter Wonderland event this past weekend where its success in marketing to Millennials became especially clear. We chatted with the channels’ stars about how their respective shows reach Gen Y and how their personal relationships with fans via social media is changing the traditional nature of television viewing.

Social media supports fandom, providing viewers with an extension of a show and its stars.

ABC FamilyABC Family’s hit show “Pretty Little Liars” is groundbreaking in terms of its social media success, with the finale for its latest season generating the most social buzz in the history of TV. Gen Y is dominating the social space, and Twitter and Facebook are a key part of how they consume content. They’re engrossed in social media to find out more about their favorite shows, stay updated on its stars, and feel part of a community of fans who rally around a show, even during the off-season. Social media is supporting the ever-evolving fandom among young viewers and ABC Family taps into this trend.

Several of the networks’ stars weighed in on the importance of social media and how it’s impacting their relationship with fans. Alexandra Chando of “The Lying…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I share my selfies by making it my profile picture.” —Female, 23, IL

It’s time to let go of the stereotype that men hate shopping: men are actually spending about $10 more than women on clothing and accessories each month, according to a new study. Menswear is expected to expand by 8.3% in the next year, 4.1% more than womenswear. Not surprisingly, Millennial guys are approaching their fashion and shopping differently, with males under 35-years-old more likely to purchase athletic and athleisure styles. Younger male consumers are also 27% more likely than those over 35-years-old to be influenced by sales staff. (The Muse)

Second screen marketing was one of the big trends of this Sunday’s big game, and Instagram reports that 38 million users engaged with Super Bowl content 155 million times that day. Social media vendor Engagement Labs looked at likes, comments, and clicks to see which brands were the event’s Insta-MVPs and declared Pokémon, Disney’s The Jungle Book,Squarespace, SoFi, and Acura the top five performers. Pokémon asked viewers to call out all the Pokémon references their ad in the Instagram comments, and The Jungle Bookposted a link to the full movie trailer on Instagram right after airing it on TV. (Adweek

Blend is a texting app “built for Gen Z,” with plans to use their popularity on college campuses to grow into competition for WhatsApp and iMessage. The app was created by two college drop-outs who secured $3 million in funding after the release of a controversial promotional video made the app go viral on the former students’ Michigan campus. Their biggest challenge will be retaining Millennials and teens in the crowded messaging space, and Blend is relying on their “snappy design” and focus on photos and video sharing to get them on top.
(San Francisco News

Millennials know you think they’re narcissistic—and they think so too. New research shows Millennials agree that they are more self-involved than older generations: 18-25-year-olds rated themselves a 61.4 (on a 100-point scale) for narcissism, and rated those 60 years or older at 38. However, older respondents “in particular piled on Millennials for their narcissism, while absolving their own age group,” and those 60 and older ranked Millennials as 65.3 on the narcissism scale, and put themselves at 26.5. Unsurprisingly, the study notes that Millennials don’t appreciate constantly being told they’re narcissistic. (Mental Floss

Millennials are looking for something to talk about on social media, and IfOnly is providing the exclusive experiences they can be proud to broadcast. When we first wrote about the site their target users were those with a lot more to spend, but over the past few months they’ve been adding “amazing but highly accessible” offerings—like playing with pandas at a zoo—for a broader audience, priced at $50-$125 per person. IfOnly believes that Millennials on social media will pave the way to their success: “they’re on social media channels, where it’s not fun to post about a belt but it is fun to [post a picture, saying], ‘Check me out backstage.’” (TechCrunch

Quote of the Day: “I am planning to give an iPhone 6s as a gift for this Valentine’s Day.”

—Male, 31, NY

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies