A Myers-Briggs, Strauss-Howe Millennial Analysis Mash-Up

TODAY’S POST COMES FROM YPULSE’S DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, CASANDRA LIGGIN.

I recently decided to take a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator workshop to better understand myself.  For those of you that haven’t heard of Myers-Briggs, it’s a famous assessment designed to measure psychological preferences in how people perceive the world and naturally make decisions.  Typically, you don’t think about the way you make decisions or why you have that “gut” instinct so, needless to say, the course was intriguing. 

For many, this could seem extremely far out and have no real bearing on one’s life; but, upon further examination, I found that there is some truth to one’s identity with these four key letters. I learned that I fall into the INFJ category (Introversion, Intuition, Feeling, Judging).  To sum it up, this means that I am an idea generator and love to discover “win-win” solutions that have a long-term positive impact on people.  I’m also a good listener and believe in seeing all angles of an issue before making a decision.  

During the course of my workshop, generational cohorts were analyzed based on the Myers-Briggs theory. Boomers are known as ENFPs (Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, Perception), Xers are INTJs (Introversion, Intuition, Thinking, Judgment) and Millennials are ESFPs (Extraversion, Sensing, Feeling, Perception). These are all generalizations of course and no one theory can be looked at in a vacuum when understanding an entire generation.  However, in looking at Millennials as ESFPs, their primary mode of living is focused externally and they live in the moment.  (YOLO anyone?)  They are also very spontaneous, optimistic and love instant gratification.  That being said, this definitely jives with everything I have studied on Millennials.  

In…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

“I saw some heartbreaking stories in the internet, and decided to look up some international charities and donate to them.”—Male, 20, WA

Magazine covers aren’t dying in the age of digital—even when publications go out of print. Digital-only covers are “captur[ing] the print magazine's tangible essence” while building hype for media brands on social media (especially Instagram). PorterComplexNylonGQ and more publications have taken on the trend, featuring celebrities like Chance the Rapper to Sophie Turner. For magazines looking for a comeback with young consumers, digital-only covers can “translate their own brand for the web." (Fashionista)

Following “a series of scandals,” YouTube is taking major steps to overhaul its video review process and ad placement policies. The new guidelines “kick tens of thousands of video makers out” of the ad program by requiring anyone who generates ad revenue to produce 4,000 hours of content and gain 1,000 subscribers in one year, upping the ante from the previous requirement of 10,000 lifetime views. YouTube is also promising to manually review every video in its top tier of advertising (Google Preferred), and they’ve hired 10,000 new employees in the last year to get the job done. (recode)

Some Millennial parents are applying their minimalist tendencies to their kids’ toy chests to battle play clutter with “toy limitation.” It’s not a new concept—some schools of thought that have “advocate[d] simple, open-ended toys” include Montessori, Waldorf, and RIE—and today’s advocates say limiting toys can improve focus and happiness. A report from the University of Toledo concluded that toddlers “played ‘better’” when given fewer toys, meaning they played with each toy for longer and in more creative ways. However, some parents worry that they’re “denying [their children’s] self-expression” when they limit toys, and so the debate continues. (Slate)

Tostitos is giving fans their very own personalized Super Bowl ads to invite friends to their game parties. The platform takes a user's name, address, and other invite info and spins it into a video perfect for Customization Nation. Each ad features a different combination of Super Bowl clichés, including a “talking baby, puppies, sassy older women, [and] a celebrity pitchman.” Considering Ypulse data shows 64% of 13-34-year-olds watched some or all of the 2017 Super Bowl with friends and family, it’s a safe bet at least some will be sending out invites, possibly with some Tostitos product placement this year. (Adweek)

Facebook’s new feature lets Groups co-view each other’s content. “Watch Party” allows Group admins to show any Facebook video to members simultaneously, and to comment on a “dedicated reel” for a “shared viewing experience.” The feature is another step towards the platform’s new goal to “encourage meaningful social interactions,” and their new focus on Groups. The push for social viewing could possibly be integrated into other aspects of Facebook and its properties, like group chats. (TechCrunch)

“I plan to go to a free barre class at a local studio that is offering them as part of a New Year's promotion.”—Female, 33, MA

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