A Gen X Perspective of the Working Millennial

Today's post comes from Dan Coates, President of Ypulse. As President of a youth market research company and father of two Millennials, Dan has plenty of experience with this generation. Below, he gives his perspective on what Millennials are really like to work with and gives them some advice to help guide their way.

MILLENNIALS IN THE WORKPLACE

No matter what generation you belong to, you'll never forget your first job.  That time when there is nothing but potential and possibilities.  You're young, energetic, determined and the simple fact is that, at this early juncture, hopes outnumber disappointments.  Freshly minted.  Bright eyed.

While we X'ers and Boomers like to tease, the fact of the matter is that we're all jealous as hell.  While experience is merely a by-product of age, youth is fleeting and those of us that let it slip away unnoticed realize that we're never getting it back. Less than a quarter of our organization is comprised of non-Millennials. 

We X'ers would love to tell you how awful it was when we entered the workplace, but it's hard not to see that, following the great recession, you Millennials have been dealt a pretty dirty hand.  Try to think of this as more of a temporary setback than a defining moment. 

While I'd strongly recommend Lindsay Pollack's book, Getting from College to Career as great advice on how to get your first job and Neil Howe and Reena Nadler's Millennials in the Workplace as a primer for where your generation fits in, here's some inter-generational advice as to what to consider once you've gotten in the door:

1. It's Not About You:  I know, I know.  You're really focused on you right now.  Totally understandable.  You've spent years learning and studying.  You want to flex those muscles.  You have student…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite store to shop in is The Apple Store. Best store layout i have every experienced. They have the products I want and the expertise to answer any questions.” –Male, 19, VA

Those fretting about the "dating apocalypse" are missing a lot, but it's true that dating in the digital age is full of complications for young consumers. While some truly believe that so-called hookup culture is the problem, there is another theory out there for the modern dating scene’s issues: math. The book DATE-ONOMICS: How Dating Became a Lopsided Numbers Game argues that hookup culture is actually a result of unequal numbers in the gender pool. In short, far more women are going to college, and “when gender ratios skew toward women, as they do today among college grads, the dating culture becomes more sexualized.” (Washington Post)

Every parent who has asked, “What were they thinking?!” when they see teens’ questionable social media posts finally has an answer: nothing. Ask.fm’s recent survey found that 80% of teens post status updates, or send tweets without thinking about the consequences of what they’re broadcasting. But many of their parents don’t actually know what’s being posted anyway: 43% say they don’t keep tabs on their children’s online activity. (Jezebel)

When Millennials get over their wariness of the stock market and actually do invest, they still aren’t making the same choices their parents did. Younger investors favor “passive management,” and tend to choose less volatile stocks. Unsurprisingly, their tech-reliance is also influencing their investments, and they're using online wealth management tools and “robo-advisors,” while Boomers still rely on information from peers, traditional brokers, and financial advisors. (Nasdaq)

According to a recent Ypulse monthly survey, 91% of 13-32-year-olds say they care about their health and being healthy, and 73% say they enjoy exercising—so it makes sense that it’s young consumers who are spending on health and wellness products. Another recent study found that one in three Millennials share health content through social media, texts, or email every week. Their fitness behavior is driving the growth in health tech: health and wellness apps have seen 171% annual growth in usage. (MediaPost)

We’ve told you about the unique and wonderful talents of YouTuber Todrick Hall in the past, but in case you missed that, Fast Company has a “Non-Millennials’ Guide” to Hall—because he’s now got his own show on MTV. Todrick, which premieres tonight, is a reality show that gives viewers a behind-the-scenes look at Hall and his creative crew making their musical online videos. The singer's YouTube channel currently has over 1.6 million followers. (Fast Company)

Quote of the Day: "My favorite place to shop online is Sephora, because I love high end makeup and I love reading about what's new and watching tutorials on how it works.” –Female, 26, MA

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