A Different Side of Global Millennials: The Friday Don’t Miss List

This week we're following up with content you might have missed in maker culture, global trends, tech, and the workplace with a Millennial focused eye.

1. Mommy on the Job? Maybe Not
In our Essentials this week, we let you know about brands like PepsiCo and LinkedIn that are incorporating Millennials’ parents into the hiring process, but warned that “bring-your-parents-to-work-day” may not be fun for everyone. Don’t miss the reactions to the original article that serve to either explain or mock this new trend. Millennials are indeed closer to their parents than generations before them, and while sociological changes are underway as they fill the workforce, older generations can’t help but scoff at the implications of helicopter parenting in the workplace.
2.  A Different Side of Global Millennials
This week’s guest post from JWT MENA introduced you to the Mipsterz—a sub-culture of Millennial Muslims who are challenging long-held Muslim perceptions through their adoption of hipster styles and pastimes. Exploring the Mipster trend globally, we don’t want you to miss this recreation of Pharrell’s “Happy” video, specifically showcasing modern-day Muslims in Britain. The Honest Policy, a group for global empowerment and change, captured the footage through contributions from a variety of people across the country.
3. Memories in a Digital Time Capsule
Hyper-nostalgia mobile apps are flooding the market, targeting Millennial audiences who want to put the past in the present and easily store newly made memories. Don’t miss out on Saga, a Seattle startup app that lets users share multiple streams of data at once. For example, after a vacation users can "bundle" their location tags and share the bundle with friends as a map of their experience. Data can be shared selectively to…


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Quote of the Day: “My financial priority is getting a job and getting out of my parents’ house.” –Male, 20, WA

Virtual reality is poised to become an entertainment game-changer—could it revolutionize education as well? Google is pioneering Expeditions, a new “virtual field trip” program that reaches out to schools with lessons that integrate virtual reality viewers. Expensive VR headsets are not necessary since Google Cardboard is used, allowing a very new technology to be brought into classrooms at an early stage. (NYTimes)

Millennials are bringing their financial preferences to wedding planning. A survey from The Knot and PayPal found that 44% of couples wish they could make all their vendor payments via smartphone, and 42% were surprised their vendors did not accept electronic payments. They also want the “I do” day to be money-hassle-free: 70% think automated payments for remaining balances on the wedding day would be helpful. (MarketWatch)

Smartphones present a whole new set of social problems for Millennials—especially when they’re using them while drinking. New app Drunk Mode, targeting college kids, is designed to make phones safe to use while under the influence: select contacts are hidden for 12 hours to prevent dangerous drunk dialing, the “Find My Drunk” feature uses GPS to help users find drunk friends, and there are also tools for hailing safe rides and retracing intoxicated footsteps. (Springwise)

After years of magical, mystical creatures and dystopian horror stories ruling YA shelves, a new wave of novels are making more relatable narratives popular again. According to Scholastic, “realism is on the rise,” and books that feature the problems of real-world teens are the next big thing. Recent examples include 21 PromsHomeroom Diaries, and Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, which was also turned into a feature film. (Scholastic)

In 2014, designer Rebecca Minkoff opened her stores of the future, featuring digital fitting rooms with large, mirrored touch screen walls that allow visitors to browse the latest collections, runway shows, photos, and other brand content . Almost a year later, those tech dressing rooms are being credited with tripling expected clothing sales. Minkoff says, “Trying something on signifies intent, and the customer may not have been thinking about buying a dress, but they see it suggested on the screen and know to ask for it.” (Digiday)

Quote of the Day: “My biggest financial goal is Financial independence from my parents.” –Female, 22, MA

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