A Different Side of Global Millennials: The Friday Don’t Miss List

This week we're following up with content you might have missed in maker culture, global trends, tech, and the workplace with a Millennial focused eye.

1. Mommy on the Job? Maybe Not
In our Essentials this week, we let you know about brands like PepsiCo and LinkedIn that are incorporating Millennials’ parents into the hiring process, but warned that “bring-your-parents-to-work-day” may not be fun for everyone. Don’t miss the reactions to the original article that serve to either explain or mock this new trend. Millennials are indeed closer to their parents than generations before them, and while sociological changes are underway as they fill the workforce, older generations can’t help but scoff at the implications of helicopter parenting in the workplace.
 
2.  A Different Side of Global Millennials
This week’s guest post from JWT MENA introduced you to the Mipsterz—a sub-culture of Millennial Muslims who are challenging long-held Muslim perceptions through their adoption of hipster styles and pastimes. Exploring the Mipster trend globally, we don’t want you to miss this recreation of Pharrell’s “Happy” video, specifically showcasing modern-day Muslims in Britain. The Honest Policy, a group for global empowerment and change, captured the footage through contributions from a variety of people across the country.
 
3. Memories in a Digital Time Capsule
Hyper-nostalgia mobile apps are flooding the market, targeting Millennial audiences who want to put the past in the present and easily store newly made memories. Don’t miss out on Saga, a Seattle startup app that lets users share multiple streams of data at once. For example, after a vacation users can "bundle" their location tags and share the bundle with friends as a map of their experience. Data can be shared selectively to…

 
 

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I follow movie critics/sites on Twitter - this is the best way to find out latest news and upcoming films.”—Male, 23, AL

McDonald’s new ad is brand-free and interactive. In the TV spot starring Mindy Kaling, she never says the brand’s name and no logo appears—though she is wearing a yellow dress in front of a red background. Instead, Kaling asks viewers to go to Google and search "that place where Coke tastes so good" to find out for themselves. Requesting the viewer to take action “play[s] on how teens and twentysomethings use their phones while watching TV, while also acknowledging "how they're discovering information" they trust. The ad has been viewed almost 4 million times since being posted earlier this week. (Inc.MediaPost

Nintendo might have plans to dominate the holidays (again). Last week, the brand announced the discontinuation of the wildly popular NES Classic Edition after very limited availability—news that was not received well by gamers worldwide. But now rumor has it that the brand is working on a SNES Classic Edition that could come in time for Christmas 2017, according to Eurogamer's sources. If their response is any indication, Millennial nostalgia will guarantee a success for the relaunch of the classic console. (Let’s just hope Nintendo makes enough this time.) (WWG)  

“Satisfying videos” are trending, and brands are taking notice. Clips that feature “repetitive tasks, perfect patterns in motion or machinery processes being completed in slow motion, with relaxing music” are providing Millennials and Gen Z an escape from stress—as we explored in our In Their Heads trend. These videos—which include things like paint mixing, slime squeezing, and cake icing—are only getting more popular online: over 265,000 posts on Instagram currently live under the hashtag #satisfyingvideos. Prism TV is one brand capitalizing on the trend, with a promotional video series that shows painters mixing colors together in slow motion. (DIGIDAY

Teens are ushering in a new era of “webrooming.” According to a new Dealspotr survey, 47% of 20-year-olds and younger are using their phones as their primary source for online apparel shopping, compared to 39% of Millennials and 37% of Gen X and Boomers. However, since they are less likely to have digital payment options, they were also the most likely age group to shop in-store, signifying they are using mobile to “reverse showroom” or “webroom.” The survey also found that H&M leads as the most popular retailer for the group, followed by Forever 21. (Yahoo FinanceDealspotr

Beauty brands regularly market to Millennials by speaking to their too-busy, “chicly rushed lifestyles,” but is it the right approach? Newcomers Milk Makeup and Allies of Skin are just a few examples of brands growing their beauty empires by offering simple products that are easy to apply, have multiple uses, and can shorten routines for the busy consumer. But when it comes to beauty, quality may come before convenience, especially for young consumers who enjoy spending time on makeup routines: a Ypulse survey found that 55% of 13-33-year-olds like experimenting with different looks. (Racked

Quote of the Day: “I am passionate about beauty, and I look to Ulta, Sephora, and Bluemercury to learn what news products are out on the market and how to use them.”

—Female, 24, FL

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies