C is for Coding

Today’s post comes from Ypulse staffer Phil Savarese.

What the Post-Millennial Generation Will Know That We Don't
 
In the early civilizations of man, scribes were held in high regard because of their ability to read and write, unlike the majority of the population. Today, our scribes are those who can code. Behind all of the social networks and all of the apps we use everyday, is the code that was written to design it. Currently, coding is a skill held by a small specialized group, who have chosen it as a career, but as technology education progresses, we will likely see a next generation with "coding" on their resumes in the same way we have seen an increasing number of Millennials include "Photoshop" on theirs. If things progress, we could see coding become a knowledge set that is as commonplace as Word and Excel. 
 
Young Millennials and the post-Millennial generation are the first to interact with the digital world from the cradle on. Our recent reliance on everything digital has made coding a very useful (and profitable) skill that is in high demand in today’s app-centered world. So the ability for this young generation to participate in the creation of the digital content they have grown up with could become more and more inevitable. We are already seeing the growth of methods and tools that teach coding to kids, and a number of organizations have made moves to support coding programs that teach children the various programming languages. The potential is there for coding to become a skill of the masses, a second language to (currently very) young consumers.
 
Code.org is a non-profit organization with a goal of supporting and providing course materials for schools with computer programming or coding courses in their curriculum. They have the support of dozens of…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Music is an integral part of my life. A day without music is a bad day.” –Male, 16, MS

We’ve told you exactly what a day in Millennial and teen’s mobile use looks like, and now the Mary Meeker Internet trend report has even more stats on their phone addiction: 87% of 18-34-year-olds say their smartphone “never leaves [their] side, night or day.” They also think phones are the key to the future: three in five believe everything will be done on mobile devices in the next five years. (Time)

The YouTube Kids app may have high reviews, but an FTC complaint against the video platform reveals that the line between marketing and content is blurring more than some are comfortable with. Consumer groups are objecting to the (very popular) unboxing videos being included on the app. The clips, which feature kids and sometimes adults opening toys, could be interpreted as commercials for the product. (CNN Money

Oreos is getting weird to promote their new S’mores cookies to Millennials. The brand has released a series of PSA-style videos starring a mascot called S’morey The Unidentified Forest Creature and featuring “throwback ‘90s-style animations.” The spots, which will run on social media, are absurdist scenarios where S’morey puts out unusual campfires and doles out Oreos. (Adweek)

The legend of the entrepreneurial Millennial may be more hyped than factual. New data shows that while startup activity in the U.S. has increased overall, fewer 20-34-year-olds launched new businesses in 2014 than did 19 years ago. Student loan debt is likely contributing to their lack of entrepreneurship, and as we’ve said for some time, their risk-averse natures weigh heavily on their career decisions. (CNBC)

We're living in the age of the reboot, and marketers are trying to play off young consumers' nostalgia by bringing back retro campaigns and mascots. KFC was confident their revival of Colonel Sanders would capture the hearts of Millennials, and so far it looks like they may be right. According to the brand, the response has been about “80% positive” and they’re very happy that people are talking about the chain again. The Colonel was revived after it was discovered 60% of Millennials had never eaten at the chicken chain. (Business Insider)

72% of 13-32-year-olds are interested in travel. How do we know? Every month we reach out to our panel of over 60,000, asking 1,000 Millennials and teens about their behaviors, interests, current events, seasonal trends, changing attitudes, and new norms. The results of these monthly surveys are delivered to our Gold subscribers, and can be downloaded from our site. (Ypulse)

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