Kids Of The 90s Are Nostalgic, And Nickelodeon Satisfies Their Longing

The 90s Are All ThatNa na na-na-na; the opening credits to Nickelodeon’s hit 90s show “Clarissa Explains It All” (1991-1994) begins. A teenage Melissa Joan Hart pops up onscreen in a crop top and high ponytail as retro graphics and the all too familiar theme song introduces an episode of one of Gen Y’s favorite shows. Comfort TV is back in all its glory for today’s college students and 20-somethings to enjoy. Crop tops are cool again, but even more popular is this retro programming. In fact, it’s “all that!”

Last week, Nickelodeon debuted “The 90s Are All That,” its wildly successful new programming block, where hit shows from “the good old days” are played weekdays from 12am – 4am. The name refers to the network’s sketch comedy show “All That” (1994-2005) and couldn’t be more fitting. After one night, it became evident that this late night block of 90s shows — which currently includes “All That,” “Kenan & Kel” (1996-2000), “Clarissa Explains It All,” and “Doug” (1991-1994) — is the best idea since orange soda. Nickelodeon currently leads with 7-17 year olds, but this addition marks a major change in attracting young adults.

During the programming block’s premiere on Monday, July 25, “The 90s” reached ratings 850% higher than the channel’s previous average in the 12am – 2am block according to Nielsen Media Research. All four shows in the lineup were among the top 10 programs on basic cable for the night, averaging 555,000 total viewers. Millennials tend to stay up late, so they’re grateful for this alternative to late night talk shows.

Moreover, Nickelodeon references flooded the Twittersphere earning the network an impressive 20 worldwide trending topics. “The 90s Are All That” Facebook page reached 200,000 fans overnight, double what…


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Quote of the Day: “The issue I most care about during this presidential election is how we are going to resolve this massive student loan problem.”—Male, 23, PA

Hermés is conforming to the new definition of luxury by being more accessible to young, “fashion-obsessed” consumers. The brand has launched a “colorfully-designed” and Instagrammable space stocked with entry-level pieces—including their slimmer Twilly scarf that is priced around $160—at Nordstrom’s Seattle flagship. To allow the consumer the ability “to engage and have fun and try things on without the intimidation,” products are out in the open on “moveable hooks on magnetized walls” instead of behind glass. (Racked)

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Finance publication Barron’s has launched a Millennial-focused site to hook in the next generation of investors. With a focus on quick daily stock analysis, video, and personal finance stories, Barron’s Next aims to give young consumers “an easy way to understand the economy and begin to take their first steps as investors.” Like S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average, Barron’s Next also offers Next 50—a snapshot of stocks from brands that “young consumers love,” like Urban Outfitters and Tesla. (Digiday)  

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