8 Questions With A 19-Year-Old: Medha Satyal

We're back with our "Questions With a Millennial" feature to provide you with insights on Gen Y. Today we chatted with Medha Saytal, a 19-year-old college freshman who shared her habits and interests.

What are 5 things you couldn't live without?

1. Family and friends
2. Internet
3. Books
4. Phone
5. Coffee

How do you typically watch TV? On a set or streaming? Alone or with family or friends?

I usually watch shows alone online. It's more convenient that way; I can just watch when I have some extra time, and don't need to make other plans around when the show is on TV.

What's your preferred social network and why?

I prefer Facebook because it helps me keep up with what's going on in my friends' lives, and I find it easier to navigate than Twitter and other similar social networks.Medha Questions

About how often do you check your cellphone?

It is almost always on me, so I check it as soon as I hear it buzz unless I'm in class or a meeting.

What's the last thing you watched on YouTube?

The last thing I watched on YouTube was the newest VlogBrothers video.

How do you typically get news, if at all?

I get most of my news by browsing several online newspapers, and I also listen to the BBC World News podcast everyday.

What brand do you think really understands your generation and why?

Forever 21. The clothes are stylish and affordable. Many people in my generation are concerned about money, but still want to be dressed in something that's in style this season. I think Forever 21 gives us this, and has enough of a variety of clothing that most people can find something that fits their own style there. And the store's name appeals to young people.

What's one trend you're seeing among your generation?

Many people want unique clothes, accessories or other items -- something to…

 
 

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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “My favorite online celebrity is Jenna Marbles because she is hilarious and weird. I like how honest she is.”

— Female, 22, CA

Millennials are looking for multicultural products. According to a new Harris poll, over eight in ten 18-34-year-olds say they love exposure to different cultures, and about 32% say that purchasing and consuming foods with “multicultural flavors” is very important, compared to 27% of 35-44-year-olds and 45-54-year-olds. Almost half of Millennials also say they’re willing to spend more on brands that understand multicultural needs, and 65% agree they’re more likely to shop with a retailer that offers a wide selection of multicultural products.
(Drug Store News

National Geographic Kids is joining the chatbot revolution with a T-Rex bot. Tina the T-Rex is one of the latest bots to join Facebook Messenger, and was created to answer kids’ questions about dinosaurs. Tina’s ultimate goal is to sell subscriptions—she prompts users to sign up for the magazine at the end of conversations—and to let the brand get “into the mindset of its readers,” to form more personal relationships. Since Facebook accounts are limited to 13-year-old and older, National Geographic Kids hopes that, like their magazine, parents will use the bot along with their kids. (Digiday

Universal has discovered the “magic formula” to bring in Millennial dollars. According to a Foursquare analysis of foot traffic to theme parks, market share for Universal’s parks increased from 11% to 15-16% between 2014 to 2016, and almost half of the visitors during that time were 18-34-year-olds. Wizards and zombies are reportedly drawing in Millennials: Universal’s 2014 launch of the Wizarding World of Harry Potter spurred a 25% increase in visits mostly from Millennials for several weeks, and a recently opened Walking Dead attraction bought in 35% more Millennials than usual. (Skift

Brands who have jumped into VR may be making a very smart investment. A new survey from Greenlight VR reveals that over half of adult consumers say they are more likely to purchase from a brand that uses VR over a brand that doesn’t, most likely because 71% believe brands that use the technology seem more "forward-thinking and modern." Even consumers who have yet to try VR “had good things to say about the technology:” over nine in ten report “positive feelings” after watching an informational video on VR, 65% say they are interested in trying it, and 32% are surprised with its capabilities. (Adweek

GoldieBlox is continuing to go digital to spread the fundamentals of coding to kids. The educational brand “best known for its line of engineering toys aimed at young girls,” has launched their first paid app, GoldieBlox: Adventures in Coding. The puzzle-centric game follows Goldie, a young engineer delivering cupcakes, and asks players to “execute a sequence of commands,” to get her from one destination to another. The company has begun splitting their product development efforts between physical and digital, because “kids are spending increasingly more time playing on devices.” (TechCrunch

Quote of the Day: “You want me to list every concert I’ve been to in the past year? Are you nuts? I've been to like 30 so far this year.”

—Male, 29, NY

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