4 New Kinds Of Influencers That Brands Should Know

Millennial research, Millennial insight, Millennial marketing, Gen Z research, Gen Z marketing, Gen Z insight, youth research, youth marketing

Some new types of influencers are catching young consumers' attention, meaning they're sure to attract ad dollars from companies that wants to reach the coveted demo. Here are four kinds to keep an eye on...

Influencers are having a very real impact on purchases and purchase intent. According to our recent survey on the topic, 43% of 13-36-year-olds say that if their favorite online celebrity were to recommend a product, they would be more likely to buy it. And even more importantly, 42% have already purchased something that an online celebrity (blogger, vlogger, YouTuber, Instagrammer, etc.) has spoken about or recommended.

According to Lyst, what influencers wear has a direct effect on fashion brands' web traffic. When Selena Gomez wore a red Vetements tracksuit, searches for the luxury streetwear brand spiked 410%. Meanwhile, one Off White look from Rihanna prompted searches for the brand to rise 370% with the specific blouse she wore garnering over 3,000 views within two days. The trend continues across the industry, showing how important the Influencer Effect is for fashion brands. The impact, and tough competition, has encouraged even bigger traditional brands to jump on the trend. Under mounting pressure from Amazon, Walmart is leveraging the Influencer Effect to win over young consumers. Digiday reports that since June, Walmart has had 30 influencer partnerships with brands like Mondelez and Bigelow, creating product pages featuring online creators like Nicole Weisman and Atsuna Matsui. Walmart is also working to bring embedded buy buttons to influencer’s blogs, and so far, 15 blogs (including The Craft Patch and The Color Palette) have integrated the feature into their posts.

Now that the big brands are on board, what’s next? Well, for one thing, platforms and agencies that…

 
 

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The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I like playing and talking about [Animal Crossing] with other people. It's nostalgic for me since I've been playing games from the series from a young age.”—Female, 22, PA

Which brands had the most YouTube subscribers in 2018? In media, Warner Bros. topped the list with 6.4 million subscribers, followed by BBC and ESPN. Apple beat out last year’s winner for tech PlayStation, while Red Bull and Ford remained the reigning champs of food and beverage and automotive, respectively. Finally, Nike was first place in the clothing category for the second year running, with 30,000 more subscribers than their closest competitor, Adidas. (Tubefilter)

A “Little League for esports” is fostering future esports stars—and fans for life. Super League Gaming is bringing some much-needed organization to youth competitive gaming, building teams of young Minecraft, League of Legends, and Clash Royal players, helping them train and compete. But the program isn’t just for the next Ninja; just like traditional sports, kids get a sense of community among like-minded friends. (AP News)

Nielsen reports that Millennials actually consume less media than older demos, but more of it is digital. While the average adult consumes over ten hours of content a day, 18-34-year-olds spend less than eight hours with media. And the heaviest smartphone users are 35-49-year-olds, who spend 20 minutes more each day on average with their phones than Millennials. However, the younger demo does spend 44% of their media time with digital devices, more than older demos that spend more time with TV as they age up. (THR)

Vitaminwater is wagering $100,000 that you can’t give up your smartphone for a year. Contestants have to disconnect from internet-enabled devices where “texting is a pleasant experience” for 365 days and post a pic to Twitter or Instagram explaining why they need the digital detox. And when the year’s up, they have to prove it. Considering that 65% of 13-36-year-olds told Ypulse they would be unable to unplug from their smartphones for a week, earning that $100,000 may be harder than they know. (Fortune)

Hard seltzer revenue skyrocketed over 400% over the past 18 months. White Claw leads the way for the category with top-of-the-results organic search (they’re the number one Google result for “hard seltzer”) and a social media presence that focuses on health and wellness-related imagery. Sparkling water is already one of Millennials’ favorite things to drink, and its hard version could rise through the ranks of their top alcoholic beverages. (Gartner)

Quote of the Day: “People call [video game culture] nerdy but I see nerdy as a positive connotation.”—Female, 28, MA

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