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Dear Reader:

In March, YPulse launched our COVID-19 hub to provide accurate real-time data on the immediate, drastic changes to Gen Z and Millennials' lives in quarantine. We created nine webinars, 13 reports, and over 50 feature articles to guide brands through the crisis, and as a public service opened access to our COVID-19 articles and webinars to all readers.

Now, we're looking at what comes next for young consumers. As they navigate a post-COVID world, we'll be integrating our coverage of the pandemic's ongoing impacts into all of our subscriber-exclusive research on these generations.

On June 1, we will return to our regular reporting schedule. Current YPulse subscribers will continue to have unlimited access to all our articles, weekly behavioral reports, monthly trend reports, and monthly webinars on Gen Z and Millennials.

If you do not have a YPulse subscription, you can still keep up with the latest insights by registering at YPulse.com. Access up to three free articles each month or sign-up for the free weekly newsletter. If you're interested in joining some of the world's leading youth brands, like YouTube, TOMs, and Disney, visit Plans and Pricing. Explore how you can also leverage our platform's over 3,000,000 youth data points, hundreds of reports, and the most robust youth brand tracker to connect more deeply with Gen Z and Millennial consumers.

If you have questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out at success@ypulse.com.

The YPulse COVID-19 Hub

YPulse is carefully monitoring COVID-19’s impact on young consumers and how brands can respond. As a service to our readers, YPulse has unlocked all COVID-19 articles and newsfeed items. Check back daily for the latest news on how Millennials and Gen Zs are dramatically changing their spending, behaviors, and attitudes in the wake of the pandemic.

YPulse Subscribers:  Click below for the most complete and up-to-date data on young people and COVID-19, including exclusive reports and brand tracking data since the pandemic began.

Don't have a subscription? Discover all of the added benefits of a YPulse subscription. In the meantime, bookmark this page and stay up to date on YPulse's latest COVID-19 coverage.

See how 400+ brands have fared since the pandemic

Contact us to find out how you can access the YPulse Brand Tracker and see how over 400 brands have fared with Millennial and Gen Z consumers before and after COVID.

Did you know ...
%

of Millennials and Gen Zs have been affected by COVID-19

%

believe it's neccessary for brands to do something to help with COVID-19

%

believe brands have just as much responsibility as everyone else to help stop the spread of COVID-19

Disney just launched an animation series to help kids relax. 

May 27 2020
Disney just launched an animation series to help kids relax. Their new Zenimation Disney+ series is a collection of shorts that loops animation from popular films like Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast, Moana and Frozen 2 with soothing sound effects. With video categories like “Water,” “Nature,” “Cityscapes,” the content is meant to relax and soothe during a tough time, joining the rising entertainment trend of meditation and mindfulness content for kids. (TNW)

What are TikTok cults?

May 27 2020
What are TikTok cults? In the last few weeks, “cults” have been emerging on the popular app—a term for an “open fandom” revolving around a single creator (or “cult leader”). The most prominent cult, Stepchickens, was formed by Melissa Ong (@chunkysdead), and has more than 1.8 million followers.  Ong’s followers refer to her as the “Mother Hen,” show their loyalty by changing their profile photos to an image she selected, and wage comment battles on other influencers. Rival cults like The Jeffs, The Weenies, Babbages, The Flamingos, Duck Sanctuary, the #YeeHawSquad, The Griswolds, and many more have started to emerge, resulting in a cult “war.” (NYTimes, Distractify)

With online sales still at a high, young consumers are splurging on bikes and TVs. 

May 27 2020
With online sales still at a high, young consumers are splurging on bikes and TVs. According to a recent report from financial services firm Cowen, 76% of consumers expect to keep spending steady or increase it in the upcoming month—up 10 points compared to mid-April. Big box chains like Target and Walmart have been seeing a “resurgence in discretionary purchases” like children’s toys, exercise bikes, clothing, and puzzles—potentially thanks to the stimulus money that was sent out last month. But while spending in many categories might be on the upswing, “comfort levels around returning to public places are down”—meaning ecommerce will continue to be a priority. (Financial Times, Adweek)

Quarantunes is a celebrity-filled “invite-only” Zoom party. 

May 27 2020
Quarantunes is a celebrity-filled “invite-only” Zoom party. For the first time in its 98-year history, the iconic music venue Hollywood Bowl was forced to close for the summer due to COVID. But Richard Weitz, a partner from talent agency WME, and his 17-year-old daughter found a way for it to thrive virtually: by starting Quarantunes—a semi-weekly, “invite-only” Zoom concert series featuring remote in-home performances from artists like Seal, The Killers, and Gen Z favorite Billie Eilish. The father-daughter duo have been hosting the live series from the empty amphitheater to benefit the Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and No Kid Hungry, raising $3 million so far. (People)

Cottagecore is Gen Z’s way of coping with the pandemic. 

May 27 2020
Cottagecore is Gen Z’s way of coping with the pandemic. Young consumers have pivoted to new fashion trends in response to quarantines, and cottagecore “is an aesthetic on the rise.” Cooped up teens who want to indulge in the fantasy of being “soft and domestic” and get caught up in picking flowers, cooking, cleaning, and “daintily” decorating their homes are attracted to this comforting content, which has over 212 million views on TikTok. For many, it’s not necessarily a realistic lifestyle for them, but images of “pressed lilacs, frilly dresses, moss covered trees and thatch-roof cottages” provide a combination of escapist fantasy and self-care. (Study Breaks)