Everything you need to know about Gen Z and Millennial research and marketing, at your fingertips.

The Newsfeed

Quote of the Day: “I have vision loss, and [AR app Aira] is a useful technology for people with my disability”—Female, 32, NH

Office Depot is opening a coworking space. Why is the retailer taking a page out of WeWork’s playbook? They’re making the best use of shrinking store space in the retail wasteland by prioritizing their platform for small businesses, which provides everything from personal advisors to technical support. While their “Workonomy Tech Services Kiosks” are launching at 141 stores, their in-person “Hub” offering will open at one California location. (Fast CompanyRetail Dive)

Tyson Foods is adopting a “startup mentality” to keep up with young consumers (and indie food brands). Gen Z is “blurring the lines of food service” by eating away from home and ordering in more often. Luckily, Tyson’s vast portfolio of foods are available both in stores and restaurants, giving them a competitive advantage over niche up-and-comers. They’re also playing into young diners’ penchant for Experiencification with products like a charcuterie-inspired meat assortment. (Forbes)

Winky Lux’s pop-up store is luring in Instagram-loving young consumers. The indie beauty brand opened a temporary “Experience Store” where visitors tour seven “whimsical” rooms like a “Disco Ball Room” that plays K-pop and a mini coffee shop. Winky Lux’s founder wanted the store to look “like flowers vomited everywhere” and thinks that “There’s no social capital in shopping in a [traditional] beauty store—there’s nothing that’s shareable.” (NYP)

JAM Audio is taking cues from streetwear to appeal to young consumers. The speaker and headphone store is shaking up its branding, with one exec explaining that “Streetwear and personalization played major roles in how we redesigned the product, packaging and website, and how we approached our retail strategy.” Switching from greyscale products and marketing to “bold hues” is meant to up their Instagrammability and encourage social sharing. (Forbes)

Influencers are reluctant to rep cannabis brands. Only 30% of the agency Heartbeat’s influencers are willing to post marijuana-related ads because, as the CEO explains, “They are scared of legal ramifications, and they don’t want YouTube to shut them down.” Their fears aren’t unfounded. Leading weed-fluencer Bess Byers just had her Instagram account disabled, while YouTube’s “weed purges” have closed popular pages like Loaded Up. (Digiday)

Quote of the Day: “I use the Spotify app to keep myself in good mood. I love music.”—Male, 18, TX

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