Ypulse Interview: Jake Sasseville, Late Night Republic

jakesassevilleToday’s Ypulse Interview is with Jake Sasseville, 24 year-old host of “Late Night Republic.” Jake first flashed on to the Ypulse radar back in 2008 when his earlier Gen Y riff on late night programming “The Edge with Jake Sasseville” debuted on more than 40 ABC affiliates and he first started turning heads (and winning brands) with his bold personality and equally dynamic approach to product integration. Clearly, we suspected, this was a youth entrepreneur to watch…

And watch they have. Last month, Jake launched his latest late-night project in 75 markets and was profiled by Ad Age, reg. required, for winning out over Leno, Conan and the like as Procter & Gamble’s platform of choice to promote Pringles Xtreme crisps. Below, we catch up with Jake to hear more about this new venture, his winning formula and what it takes to reach Gen Y audiences today.

Ypulse: How did you first get interested in the talk show business? What lessons did you learn starting out?

Jake Sasseville: Well, I actually didn’t start in TV if I’m honest with you. I started out as a magician learning how to influence people, hopefully make them laugh and certainly get a lot of rejection. I got a lot of rejection as a magician… mainly because I used to mess up my tricks a lot. But I started in Maine at 13 years-old and I would go to restaurants and shakedown the owner to hire me for $60 an hour to do walk-around magic while their customers would wait for their food.

So, that’s how it began. And then I realized I wanted to do more than magic and have more impact, so I used that money that I made as a magician to invest in a local access TV show at 14 and 15 years old. That’s how the dream started and I wasn’t really expecting it go anywhere. As time progressed though and I became more interested in working with…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “If I played the lottery tomorrow and won $100,000,000 I would pay off my college loans and buy myself a good car, pay off my mother's debt and then save the rest for anything that might happen in the future.” –Female, 18, AL

This weekend, climate marches around the world attracted young consumers who are speaking up about their environmental concerns, and have no hesitation in calling out political leaders who aren’t willing to do the same. In New York, the thousands who gathered for the People’s Climate March demanding action on climate change included over 300 colleges represented by marching delegates. With statistics showing that by 2015 the youth vote will surpass Baby Boomers', Millennial concerns like these will increasingly shape the political conversation. (MSNBC)

We know that Millennials are marrying later in life than previous generations, but a new study from the journal Emerging Adulthood has shed some more light on the emotional reasons that might be. The research takes a deeper look into college students’ views on the institution, dividing 571 students at a public university in the Midwest into three different categories: “enthusiasts,” “hesitants,” and “delayers.” A full 58% fell into the “hesitants” category, a group that ”appeared to value marriage and expect to marry but were more hesitant about the permanence of marriage and expect to marry later than what they thought would be ideal.” (NYMag)

The generation labeled as “boomerang kids” is beginning to leave the nest. According to new Census Bureau data, 18-34-year-olds are gradually moving out of their parents’ homes: 31.1% live with parents in 2014, down from 31.2% in 2013, and a peak of 31.6% in 2012. However, the percentage of young adults heading their own household did not go up. So where are they going? Renting and moving in with other family members are most likely the answer, as the numbers for both categories rose slightly for the same age group. (Huffington Post)

After a successful test in Europe, Toys ‘R’ Us and Claire’s have announced a partnership that will create 100 branded Claire’s shops in European branches of the toy franchise, as well as 12 in the United States. After several attempts to strengthen the tween market of the well-known store, Toys ‘R’ Us is hoping to capitalize on the seemingly never-ending need for jewelry and accessories in the life of a tween girl to attract them. (MediaPost

They might not trust big institutions, but Millennials may have more faith in large corporations than meets the eye. A study that looked at 18-30-year-olds in 17 countries found that these consumers “look to the corporate world to solve global problems.” 82% believe that businesses are capable of doing more to help the world, and make the biggest impact addressing societal issues. They also want to work with those companies that make an effort to make change: 51% say they would personally like to get involved with making the world a better place, and 69% want brands to make it easier for them to get involved. (Fortune)

Millennial social media, spending, and media behaviors aren't easy to keep up with. So we track data in each of these areas in our bi-weekly survey of 1000 14-32-year-old Millennials nationwide to keep an eye on the trends that emerge. Our Silver and Gold subscribers get access to regularly updated data trend charts broken out by age and gender. We do the heavy data lifting for you, and we’re constantly adding new statistics to our database. (Ypulse)

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