Ypulse Essentials: Apple's Steve Jobs Steps Down, Department Stores Are Digital Leaders, Selena Gomez' Fan Inspired Fragrance

Apple, the hottest brand among Millennials, is changing hands (Steve Jobs — one of the most visionary leaders in marketing and technology — has stepped down as the company’s CEO, and Tom Cook, the former COO, will take his place. We have Jobs to thank for some of the most influential products today including iTunes, the iPod, iPhone, and the iPad, so what does this mean for the future of Apple? Not much…he’ll still be very involved and the company probably won’t change. In other tech news, children rarely watch TV without using other devices simultaneously. In fact, according to a UK survey, they use up to five screens at a time!) (NY Times) (Huffington Post) (The Telegraph)

- Department stores have high digital IQs (because of their impressive social media strategies, sleek site designs, and engaging mobile campaigns. Macy’s ranks as the most digitally driven retailer, followed by Victoria’s Secret, Nordstrom, and Sephora. To remain digitally-savvy, however, brands should institute F-commerce, so customers can purchase products directly on Facebook. In other fashion news, teenagers prefer brands that value self-expression and aspiration, rather than ones with homogenous styles. They like to customize clothes and reflect their own values) (WWD) (Customer Management IQ)

- Rather than just creating another celebrity fragrance (since there clearly aren’t enough of those already, Selena Gomez has a smart strategy: she’s letting fans pick her perfume. They’ll vote online for their favorite ingredients and the most popular ones will be mixed together. She’s also giving away free samples to the first 50,000 people who vote. Between the customization, online engagement, and rewards, this has all the makings of a successful marketing campaigning. We wonder if it will do…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

“I won’t buy an already-made costume to dress up in for Halloween because I prefer using my creativity to come up with an uncommon or personalized costume to wearing a mass-produced costume that won't be unique to me.” –Male, 24, CA

One entrepreneur has a big idea to change charity fundraising as we know it—and she’s only 10-years-old. Vivienne Harr started a lemonade stand for charity in 2012 that has turned into Make A Stand lemonade, a family company that donates 5% of each sale. Now, the Harrs are launching StandApp, a mobile platform for donating to and starting crowdfunded social good projects. Twitter’s founders have invested in the app, which tells users they can “make a stand and change the world in 3 steps and 30 seconds.” (Fast Company)

Vice media has established themselves as creators of online content that speaks to young consumers, and now they will launch a global, 24 hour TV network for their Millennial audience. The brand’s Vice News has gotten a reputation for tackling some of the biggest international stories before much more established news organizations, and CEO Shane Smith warned traditional media outlets that as the generation ages up, they will become obsolete, and sites like Vice and BuzzFeed are “the changing of the guard.” (The IndependentThe Drum)

Posting calories counts on menus isn’t necessarily making consumers choose healthier options, but a new study has found that if told what they would have to do to burn off those calories, teens are less likely to buy higher calorie or sugary drinks. When signs were posted in stores telling buyers things like, “Did you know that working off a bottle of soda or fruit juice takes about 5 miles of walking,” 40% of 12-18-year-olds who saw them said they changed their drink choice as a result. Even after the signs were removed these teens continued to make healthier choices. (Washington Post)

Italian clothing label Brandy Melville has reportedly become “one of the fastest growing popular brands among American teens,” but the company is not interested in selling to everyone: they sell most items only in size small. Abercrombie & Fitch has famously lost ground with young consumers thanks to their similarly exclusionary practices, and some teens are expressing their dissatisfaction on Melville’s Instagram, where they are asking for sizes that “fit all.” (Tech Times)

Many Millennials don’t trust banks (or any other large institutions) but it could be that financial organizations are missing a big opportunity with the generation. Adweek’s recent study found that 18-24-year-olds are more likely than other consumers to say they would trust a financial institution more if they provided helpful, unbiased content. But only 20% of respondents felt that these institutions are currently posting interesting articles. (Adweek)

That image at the bottom of our newsletter is a gateway to insights and expert commentary on current and future Millennial trends. Clicking on it takes readers to our daily insights article, available to Silver and Gold subscribers, which illuminates a facet of Millennial culture and helps subscribers to understand the "why" behind the "what." Drawing from our ongoing collection of proprietary data, our deep-dive desk research, and our 10-year history of studying this generation, we figure out what it all means for brands and marketers. (Ypulse)

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