Ypulse Essentials: Amazon's Kindle Fire, Music's Hottest Acts Under 21, Dove's DJs Target Young Women

Kindle FireAmazon’s new Kindle Fire looks sleek and cool (and at a mere $199 complete with Amazon’s Cloud storage (!), it bests Barnes & Noble’s Nook Color in cost and competes on functionality. We agree that it’s no iPad killer, however, because of its mere 8GB of memory and lack of 3G. But we wonder how long it will take Android hackers to jailbreak the device of it’s native software to turn it into a fully customizable Android tablet, as has happened with the Nook Color. The Fire wasn’t the only new Kindle revealed today. The standard Kindle has been redesigned and got a new low price tag of $79, and two new touchscreen Kindles hit the market for $99 and $149, with and without 3G, respectively) (Cnet) (Ars Technica) (Amazon)

- Billboard’s annual list of music’s hottest minors, aka top acts under age 21 (includes many of the usual suspects, topped off by Justin Bieber — no surprise there. Five of the acts on the list are Disney stars, from Miley Cyrus to Selena Gomez, and many of the others got their break on reality shows like “American Idol” — we’re looking at you, Scotty McCreery. We were excited to see Mindless Behavior on the list after they won our hearts performing at this year’s Youth Mega Mashup!)

- We dig Dove’s new ‘Fresh Spin’ campaign (featuring three hip young women DJs to grab the attention of women aged 18-34. Dove hooked up with MTV for the campaign, promoting it at the recent MTV Video Music Music Awards and adding fun video content to dove.mtv.com. Deodorant never seemed so cool) (NYTimes)

- With the current state of employment in America, many Gen Yers (are freelancing, working independently, and starting their own businesses. And for those who don’t enjoy working from home, there’s a variety of share office space options to get the collegial spirit of a regular…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

“I won’t buy an already-made costume to dress up in for Halloween because I prefer using my creativity to come up with an uncommon or personalized costume to wearing a mass-produced costume that won't be unique to me.” –Male, 24, CA

One entrepreneur has a big idea to change charity fundraising as we know it—and she’s only 10-years-old. Vivienne Harr started a lemonade stand for charity in 2012 that has turned into Make A Stand lemonade, a family company that donates 5% of each sale. Now, the Harrs are launching StandApp, a mobile platform for donating to and starting crowdfunded social good projects. Twitter’s founders have invested in the app, which tells users they can “make a stand and change the world in 3 steps and 30 seconds.” (Fast Company)

Vice media has established themselves as creators of online content that speaks to young consumers, and now they will launch a global, 24 hour TV network for their Millennial audience. The brand’s Vice News has gotten a reputation for tackling some of the biggest international stories before much more established news organizations, and CEO Shane Smith warned traditional media outlets that as the generation ages up, they will become obsolete, and sites like Vice and BuzzFeed are “the changing of the guard.” (The IndependentThe Drum)

Posting calories counts on menus isn’t necessarily making consumers choose healthier options, but a new study has found that if told what they would have to do to burn off those calories, teens are less likely to buy higher calorie or sugary drinks. When signs were posted in stores telling buyers things like, “Did you know that working off a bottle of soda or fruit juice takes about 5 miles of walking,” 40% of 12-18-year-olds who saw them said they changed their drink choice as a result. Even after the signs were removed these teens continued to make healthier choices. (Washington Post)

Italian clothing label Brandy Melville has reportedly become “one of the fastest growing popular brands among American teens,” but the company is not interested in selling to everyone: they sell most items only in size small. Abercrombie & Fitch has famously lost ground with young consumers thanks to their similarly exclusionary practices, and some teens are expressing their dissatisfaction on Melville’s Instagram, where they are asking for sizes that “fit all.” (Tech Times)

Many Millennials don’t trust banks (or any other large institutions) but it could be that financial organizations are missing a big opportunity with the generation. Adweek’s recent study found that 18-24-year-olds are more likely than other consumers to say they would trust a financial institution more if they provided helpful, unbiased content. But only 20% of respondents felt that these institutions are currently posting interesting articles. (Adweek)

That image at the bottom of our newsletter is a gateway to insights and expert commentary on current and future Millennial trends. Clicking on it takes readers to our daily insights article, available to Silver and Gold subscribers, which illuminates a facet of Millennial culture and helps subscribers to understand the "why" behind the "what." Drawing from our ongoing collection of proprietary data, our deep-dive desk research, and our 10-year history of studying this generation, we figure out what it all means for brands and marketers. (Ypulse)

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