Ypulse Essentials: Amazon's Kindle Fire, Music's Hottest Acts Under 21, Dove's DJs Target Young Women

Kindle FireAmazon’s new Kindle Fire looks sleek and cool (and at a mere $199 complete with Amazon’s Cloud storage (!), it bests Barnes & Noble’s Nook Color in cost and competes on functionality. We agree that it’s no iPad killer, however, because of its mere 8GB of memory and lack of 3G. But we wonder how long it will take Android hackers to jailbreak the device of it’s native software to turn it into a fully customizable Android tablet, as has happened with the Nook Color. The Fire wasn’t the only new Kindle revealed today. The standard Kindle has been redesigned and got a new low price tag of $79, and two new touchscreen Kindles hit the market for $99 and $149, with and without 3G, respectively) (Cnet) (Ars Technica) (Amazon)

- Billboard’s annual list of music’s hottest minors, aka top acts under age 21 (includes many of the usual suspects, topped off by Justin Bieber — no surprise there. Five of the acts on the list are Disney stars, from Miley Cyrus to Selena Gomez, and many of the others got their break on reality shows like “American Idol” — we’re looking at you, Scotty McCreery. We were excited to see Mindless Behavior on the list after they won our hearts performing at this year’s Youth Mega Mashup!)

- We dig Dove’s new ‘Fresh Spin’ campaign (featuring three hip young women DJs to grab the attention of women aged 18-34. Dove hooked up with MTV for the campaign, promoting it at the recent MTV Video Music Music Awards and adding fun video content to dove.mtv.com. Deodorant never seemed so cool) (NYTimes)

- With the current state of employment in America, many Gen Yers (are freelancing, working independently, and starting their own businesses. And for those who don’t enjoy working from home, there’s a variety of share office space options to get the collegial spirit of a regular…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “When I hear the phrase ‘The American Dream' I think…A loaded term that is meaningless these days. At this point, I'd be happy if I can manage to live a mostly comfortable, independent life. Is that The American Dream? I don't know.” –Male, 25, PA

When it comes to kids using tablets and smartphones, most of the attention is given to the dangers of it all: what will it do to their attention spans, their minds, or their health? But there are potential positives to their mobile use as well. One (Millennial) mom’s reasons for continuing to give her kids handheld devices include the importance of encouraging their technology and problem solving skills, expectations that they will know how to use them in school, and a hope that her girls will be involved in tech in their futures. (Hip Mombrarian)

This might be the year that vending machines became a full blown marketing trend, and Nike has put their own athletic spin on the tactic. Their recent “secret” vending machine in NYC, the Nike+ FuelBox, dispensed products like hats, shirts, and socks that visitors could only pay for with daily points from their Nike+ FuelBands, encouraging exercise in exchange for goods. (Engadget)

We’ve seen FoMo, the rise and fall of YOLO, and now social media has given us MoMo, the “Mystery of Missing Out.” Unlike FoMo, Fear of Missing Out when you see your friends posting a ton of fun pictures on social media, MoMo is the anxiety that results when friends stop posting. In the words of one Millennial, “’what can be so good that they aren't posting?’” It might seem silly to some, but for a generation used to being connected with friends nearly all the time, the feeling of exclusion that results from being left out and unaware of what’s happening is real. (Jezebel)

The value of higher education is already being questioned by Millennials, and evidence is continuing to mount that college systems and hierarchies need to be rethought. One former Yale professor is making headlines by telling parents not to send their kids to Ivy League schools, and that those who attend are not the “winners in the race we have made of childhood” but that instead elite education produces “anxious, timid, and lost” young people. (New Republic)

Oh, Barbie. She's had a rough year, and Mattel recently released an Entrepreneur Barbie in an attempt to tap into girl power marketing, and revive flagging sales. But is the reality that Barbie is just too perfect for today’s kids? The brand’s offbeat, weirdo Monster High dolls do far better than pristine, “clean cut” blond icon. Tapping into new trends in toy tech and giving Barbie a renewed sense of “imaginative play” might help, but at the same time post-Millennials, like the generation before them, could be turned off by anything that doesn’t show some flaws. (The StarPhoenix)

Quote of the Day: “When I hear the phrase ‘The American Dream’ I think of 1950s cliches, the economic downturn of 2008, and how college debt has pretty much made it impossible.” –Female, 17, RI

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