Youth Media And Marketing Movers & Shakers

Today we bring you another installment of Youth Media Movers and Shakers. We’ve culled through industry publications looking for the recent executive placements we think you should know about. If you have executive news that you want us to highlight in our next “Movers and Shakers,” email us.

Rich Ross resigns as Chairman of Walt Disney Studios, leaving behind a legacy of “film flops” and questions about the studio’s future. (Via LA Times)

Cecile Frot-Coutaz is named CEO for FremantleMedia; she is currently CEO, FremantleMedia North America. Her appointment was announced simultaneously with the news that current CEO, Tony Cohen, is stepping down from that position to focus on his non-executive work. (Via Hollywood Reporter)

Disney Publishing Worldwide makes two appointments: Darrell DeMakes is named Senior Producer, Digital; he had been Senior Manager at Nokia. Michele Wells has been named Senior Editor, Digital; she had been senior editor at DK Publishing. (Via Mediabistro, reg required)

Tom Ascheim is named to the newly created position of Chief Strategy Officer and EVP/Sesame Learning at Sesame Workshop. Most recently, Ascheim was the CEO of Newsweek, and he previously ran Nickelodeon’s TV group, overseeing Nickelodeon, Nick at Nite, Nick Jr., Noggin (now Nick Jr. channel), Nicktoons and The N (TeenNick). (Via Cynopsis)

Jennifer LaBracio has joined Little, Brown Books for Young Readers as Associate Director of Marketing. She was most recently Senior Marketing Manager at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children’s. (Via Publishers Marketplace)

Condé Nast Entertainment announces two hires: Jeremy Steckler becomes EVP of Motion Pictures and Michael Klein becomes EVP of alternative programming. (Via MediaPost)

Jamie Engel has been named VP and Publisher at Scholastic Parent &…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “When looking for a significant other, it’s important to me that they are open minded and an independent thinker.” –Male, 15, CA

Constant internet access via smartphones helped created the issue of cyberbullying, but could it also help to end it? New app Stop!t was created by a concerned dad to make it quick, easy, and effective for kids to anonymously report any bullying incident they see on social media. Previous digital efforts to fight cyberbullying required multiple steps in order to file a report, but Stop!t will allow students to report bullying with a single click, even if the app isn’t open. The app has been tested in several schools, and seen positive results so far, with one school reporting an 80% reduction in cyberbullying incidents compared to the previous year. (Fast Company)

Snapchat has an important message for its young users: “keep your clothes on!” 53% of 13-17-year-olds use Snapchat, according to Ypulse’s most recent social media tracker survey, and the app has long battled a reputation as a sexting haven. New community guidelines recently posted by the app are serving as a gentle, but stern reminder for minors to “Keep it legal.” Team Snapchat is trying to pull in the reigns on inappropriate sharing, threats, bullying, and invasions of privacy, and violating the rules could result in content removal, suspension, or being banned from the app. (New York Daily NewsSnapchat)

Will marketing healthy foods using the same tactics as unhealthy products get young consumers to eat them? The Partnership for a Healthier American and Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign are going to find out. They’re launching an effort that rebrands fruits and vegetables as “FNV,” uses celebrities like Jessica Alba and Cam Newton as spokespeople, and relies heavily on social media to convince kids that healthy is cool. While undoubtedly a worthy cause, the campaign’s success is uncertain and has been described as “cringeworthy.” (brandchannel)

"C’mon get happy" seems to be the motto of big brands in 2015, as they focus on messages of positivity and joy to appeal to young consumers. One recent study says brands that “help Millennials achieve happiness” are the most likely to earn their loyalty. McDonald’s Pay With Lovin’, Coke’s #MakeItHappy, and Dove’s #SpeakBeautiful campaigns are recent examples of campaigns attempting to engage with positive messaging, but brands who want to follow suit should remember young consumers will see through any “hollow” attempts that tell them just buying a product will make them happier. (Adweek)

Young viewers maybe be drawn to digital video because they find online stars and content more “enjoyable and relevant to their lives” than traditional TV and Hollywood A-listers. A new study by Defy Media—who it should be noted produces content for YouTube—found that 62% of 13-24-year-olds say digital content makes them “feel good,” compared to 40% who said the same of TV; and 67% say they can relate to digital content, versus only 41% who relate to TV. YouTubers also hold a high power of purchase: 63% said they’d try a product recommended by a YouTube celebrity. (Variety)

The Daily Instant Poll gives you a quick snapshot of how Millennials are weighing in on the topics that are making headlines, but there's more to our mobile network of 2 million Millennials than what makes the newsletter. Ten of our most recent featured Instant Poll results are available to Ypulse.com Silver and Gold subscribers, allowing them to compare the responses of various demographics. (Ypulse)

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