YAB Review: “Tilt” By Ellen Hopkins

Today's post comes from Skyanne, a Youth Advisory Board member and avid YA reader. She recently read "Tilt" by Ellen Hopkins, about three teens who all are involved in complicated romances that change their lives forever and cause their worlds to tilt. Skyanne praises the book for providing an emotional and real look at serious subjects. She explains how it's a story that all teens can relate to and fans of Hopkins' previous works in particular will enjoy.

YAB Review: "Tilt" By Ellen Hopkins

TiltFirst Impressions

"Tilt" is told from the perspective of three different characters, each with their own unique story, who are somehow all connected through interactions and relationships with the adults in their life. Due to this, it takes a few chapters for the reader to completely begin to understand not only each characters' story, but also the relationships that connect everyone. However, as "Tilt," like all of Ellen Hopkins' novels, is written in verse, these chapters fly by and it does not take long for the story to develop into something that is truly intriguing.

Sum It Up…

"Tilt" follows three characters, ranging in age from 14 to 18, who are all dealing with the side effects of love. Mikayla is almost 18, almost an adult, and in the perfect relationship with Dylan, the perfect boyfriend. They're the dream couple everyone wants to be and their future together is all but set in stone. That is, until Mikayla becomes pregnant the summer before they begin their senior year. There's no doubt that Dylan is the father, but what happens if they can't agree what to do with the baby?

Shane is 16 and falling in love — fast and hard — with his first boyfriend, Alex. Shane is used to keeping people on the outside, afraid to live while he watches his sister get one step closer to her…

 
 
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Quote of the day: “I’m single and I’m okay with it.” –Female, 15, MA

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