What’s Being Said About the Next Generation

Born after 2004, post-Millennials are nine-years-old and under. Some may believe the next generation is too young to pay attention to, but the reality is that post-Millennials are already being studied and examined, and the effect their generation will have on culture and brands is already being hypothesized. We watch fascinated as two-year-olds take up playing with iPads as if it were natural to them. We fret about the under-ten set’s health and the child obesity epidemic, and look on in wonder as a nine-year-old takes a fast-food CEO to task. We debate what it means for the future when some parents today embrace their sons’ decision to wear pink, or sport a tutu in public. When we say that it is time to name the next generation, we do so because the conversation about the next generation has already started and post-Millennials are already living through a unique experience; and because every generation deserves to have a name that reflects that unique experience. In preparation for our Naming the Next Generation event, we’ve taken a look at some of the recent headlines about post-Millennials to collect some of the hypotheses about the generation so far:

 

1. They’re Homebodies In Training

According to a post by generational expert (and namer of the Millennials) Neil Howe, the post-Millennial generation is spending more time than ever at home, and less time than previous generations playing outside. Howe, who will be joining us on June 26th to name the next gen, cites a study that finds that from 1997 to 2003 participation in sports and outdoor activities dropped sharply for 6-to-12-year-olds. If this trend continues for post-Millennials, we could see a generation who are not just unprecedentedly comfortable using tech, but are less comfortable with the world outside their…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “If I played the lottery tomorrow and won $100,000,000 I would save most of it, donate some of it. And I'd buy my dad a boat, because I promised I'd buy him one if I was ever a millionaire.” –Female, 15, WA

This week, celebrity Photoshopping was debated online when fans criticized Beyoncé for posting an Instagram picture that looked altered to make her look slimmer. The star (and others) have been accused of using Photoshop or other image-fixing apps on social media photos before, a practice that many feel contributes to young female fans’ body issues, and does not align with the imperfection embracing and authenticity that so many young consumers expect. (BuzzFeed)

The Cartoon Network has launched an anti-bullying campaign called “I Speak Up” to encourage kids who have been bullied to reach out to trusted adults. Viewers are being encouraged to submit videos (with the permission of their parent or guardian) to share the anti-bullying message, and some of those videos will be featured in the campaign online and on TV. Visitors to the Speak Up website can also take a pledge to stop bullying, and earn special badges while playing Cartoon Network games. (PR Newser)

Young consumers are screen multitaskers, and second screen use while watching TV is a norm—but it’s not always clear to brands how they should engage in that behavior, and just throwing a hashtag on the screen isn’t going to cut it. Now Twitter says that studios and networks that live-tweet their popular programming (post and respond to viewers while the show is happening) can “dramatically boost followers and Twitter mentions” and even bump up TV ratings. (Recode)

YouTube is coming to the big screen. The digital comedy duo who create SMOSH, a channel with 30 million subscribers, has created a movie that will be distributed by Lionsgate. The movie is being described as a “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventurefor 2014” and will star a slew of other YouTube stars. The news is another example of traditional media embracing YouTube to entice young consumers, and the mainstreaming of the site’s stars. (Fast Company)

New research has found that across all grade levels and subjects, girls get better grades than male students—around the globe. The results have caused some to wonder if schools are “set up to favor the way girls learn and trip up boys.” Male students might be less able to self-discipline themselves, a key ingredient to doing well in classes, which means that the way education is structured plays into their weaknesses. (The Atlantic

Have some lingering questions about Millennials that you need answered for an upcoming meeting? That’s what Ypulse is here for. Silver and Gold subscribers have access to Ypulse's trend and Millennial experts for quick, personalized feedback on any topic. After each insights article, subscribers can submit questions and requests directly to our experts and receive instant responses. (Ypulse)

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