Rewarding Fans Through Fame

Ben & Jerry'sIn today’s Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube obsessed culture, brands don’t just want to interact with consumers on social media, they want to create meaningful relationships with them. One way of doing this, which is quickly becoming the norm, is by leveraging fans to fame. Consumers are rewarded for their interactions and relationships with a brand by being placed on billboards, buses, in TV spots, and even by appearing in campaigns alongside celebrities!

Ben & Jerry’s for example recently took this approach in its “Capture Euphoria” campaign, where fans were challenged to Instagram pictures that embody euphoric moments. The winning pictures will be featured in Ben & Jerry’s ads in each person's hometown in print and on outdoor venues. Not only does this campaign tap into Millennial’s existing habits of using Instagram, but it also rewards them with local fame. Everyday people and their photography are celebrated, and the brand creates a bond with consumers.

Dunkin’ Donuts recently made its fans famous on a much larger scale through its “Top of the WorlDD” photo and video contest. Facebook fans were encouraged to share a photo or video of them wishing their family and friends a happy New Year and the winning ones were placed on a billboard in Times Square during New Year’s Eve. Through this approach, fans formed an emotional connection with the company and were made to feel on top of the world!

Skittles has long been a leader in this area, calling on fans to submit wacky pictures which reflect the Skittles brand or the company’s motto to taste the rainbow. Skittles rewards fans through fame each week with its “Greatest Fan in the World” feature on Facebook, a strategy that Dunkin' Donuts also uses. A fan’s name, crazy photo, and country are posted on the brand’s page,…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I haven’t had children yet because I need to finish school first.” –Female, 30, IL

Yesterday, Microsoft bought the company behind the wildly popular game Minecraft, and in doing so they’ve acquired a “multigenerational success story” and could be regaining some cool cred with younger consumers. It turns out, parents love the game, and many young Millennials and post-Millennials have embraced exploring the digital Minecraft world, hacking, building, and collaborating in the lo-fi game. (The Verge)

Yesterday, Microsoft bought the company behind the wildly popular game Minecraft, and in doing so they’ve acquired a “multigenerational success story” and could be regaining some cool cred with younger consumers. It turns out, parents love the game, and many young Millennials and post-Millennials have embraced exploring the digital Minecraft world, hacking, building, and collaborating in the lo-fi game. (The Verge)

When we asked Millennials if they would download another photo sharing app, only 17% of 18-24-year-olds said yes. Of course, if the right app caught on, they’d likely jump onboard to keep up with friends—but the truth is, it is getting harder to get consumers to try new apps. While people are spending more time on the apps they already have, especially music, fitness, and social networking apps, 65.5% in the U.S. say they aren’t downloading any in an average month. (Quartz)

Boomers grew up with protest songs as an intrinsic part of their musical culture, and sometimes like to criticize Millennials for their lack of similar tunes. But EMA’s self-released new track “False Flag” could quiet those complaints. The song talks about the experience of a generation “growing up in the shadow of 9/11,” and how that cultural turning point changed, and maybe stole, her generation’s future. (Flavorwire)

Apple’s iPhone 6 is of course the big smartphone news of the week, but while that announcement has taken over headlines, other brands are quietly innovating in the category to appeal to more niche mobile users. Panasonic has returned to the phone market, with the launch of a “connected camera,” a smartphone camera hybrid that is meant to appeal to those who are more interested in the quality of the photos they are shooting on the go than the phone features they can boast. (Engadget)

In 2013, the birth rate among women 20-24-years-old was at a record low, and it continued to decline for those 25-29-years-old. These low rates could be “here to stay,” and that might be a good thing for both Millennial moms and their kids. Working women are gaining more salary and experience with every year they delay motherhood, and their future children could have greater opportunities and even a higher lifetime income. (Bloomberg)

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