The Power Of YouTube: Don't Stop Believin'!

Journey's new singerTrue confession: I’m a karaoke junkie. My birthday is actually an annual sing down at a Chinese restaurant nestled in a strip mall near my house. My husband brought me back a little karaoke machine when he traveled to the Philippines, which lasts about 30 minutes before conking out. And while I know that love of karaoke is certainly not limited to younger people (hello “Duets”?), games like Rockband, Simon’s blistering karaoke insults on “Idol” and the endless tribute videos on YouTube have fueled a new generation of crooners.

When I saw this story about how Journey [yes, the same Journey that ended “The Sopranos” and made the series premiere of “Glee” so irresistible] found its new lead singer [on YouTube, natch!], I couldn’t look away. In a way it was like that Marky Mark movie about the cover band singer landing the gig with the real band - except that it also felt sort of reflective of what’s happening in global youth culture right now. That a young wringer for Steve Perry (or at least his voice) could post a video on YouTube and be “discovered” by the band’s original members feels like a modern narrative that is becoming more common (think: Esmée Denters).

We can probably credit karaoke for keeping bands like Journey relevant to youth across the Pacific Ocean. As for “classic rock” remaining relevant here - between the Woodstock resurgence our advisory board member Caro wrote about yesterday, VH1’s I love the 60s/70s/80s and classic tunes continuing to show up in pop culture [“500 Days of Summer” made me want to buy Hall & Oats’ greatest hits on iTunes immediately], well, let’s just say I wouldn’t be shocked to hear a similar version of this story with another incomplete band from our collective past looking to capitalize on a pop culture resurgence—at least in the short term.…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Most already-made Halloween costumes only have sexy options. Sexy Cat, Sexy Pirate. It gets old, and I don't like dressing up that way.” –Female, 18, CA

Is the bridal shower dead? Not quite, but many brides today (Millennials) have no interest in the traditional trappings of the event, and increasingly are opting to skip it altogether. Some don’t want to burden their friends with more costs, and others find that the bachelorette party is more than sufficient for female bonding. But one other major reason: they just don’t need them anymore. There's been close to a 900% rise in cohabitation before marriage over the last 50 years, which means couples have all the toasters and sheets they need. (Racked)

Math students have a new magic-like tool to solve problems. PhotoMath is an app that solves simple math equations, and “provides step-by-step instructions explaining how it got the answer.” Users simply take a picture of the equation, and text recognition technology can solve anything from fractions to linear equations. Of course, concern that the app will be used more for cheating than learning is a pretty big concern. (Mashable)

What is college life like for Millennials? One way to find out is to look at their own pictures documenting it all. The “Instagram generation” is on campus: over 37% of college age adults are on the app, and they’re snapping shots of their experiences from the classroom to the dorm room. This self-recorded gallery is a window into the lives of today’s students, their selfies, dance parties, and makeshift indoor slip-and-slides. (NYMag)

When FXX aired a marathon of The Simpsons this September, they shattered ratings records with the 18-49-year-old audience. Now the channel has released Simpsons World, a streaming app dedicated to the show, which includes lots of features beyond access to the entire Simpsons series. Users can look at the popularity of each episode, watch “clips that rock,” and a “rarities” section of video that even die-hard fans might not have seen. (Slate)

Five Below has become the fastest-growing teen retailer in the U.S. by jumping quickly onto kid and teen trends. The store was founded with the idea that kids could afford everything offered with their allowance money, and unlike other dollar stores Five Below skips the “necessities,” instead focusing on the fun things that kids would want. Though teens are fickle customers, and the store’s success depends on finding the new items that resonate with them, so far they have managed to steadily grow during a difficult time with their tactics—and with no online presence to speak of. (BuzzFeed)

Did you know searching Ypulse.com surfaces all related data that we have on the topic you need, pulled from our ongoing bi-weekly surveys of Millennials 14-32-years-old? Gold subscribers can click on “show all data” to explore in-depth tables that breaks down statistics by gender, race, ethnicity, education, and location. It’s instant, current data about the Millennials generation, at your fingertips. (Ypulse)

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