The Doogie Howser Segment: Accelerated Development

Kids these days just aren’t growing up at the pace they use to. The rapid speed of which our culture is moving and the tools that we’ve been given are no doubt affecting and shifting our human behavior. The best way to understand a culture and the direction it’s moving in is to look at the tools a society uses in their everyday life. For example, when traveling to a foreign country, something as simple as turning on the TV in your hotel room will give a foreigner great intel into a culture. Even with a language barrier, visuals are a powerful indicator of what a culture is a reflection of. 

We can’t overlook technology as the main tool, of course. The convergence of social trends, democratization of access via technology, boomers refusing to grow old, 40 is the new 30, and Millennials surpassing everyone as the most brand literate and style conscious generation on earth while at the same time struggling with adolescent adulthood...the boundaries between the generations have shifted and overlapped, rendering everyone the same age. But where does that leave the kids of the world? How are they maturing, and at what pace? While older Millennials are experiencing a prolonged adolescence, it seems as though the younger set (and the next generation) is getting older faster.

Back in 2009, Nielson reported that children aged 2-11 comprised of nearly 16 million, or 9.5 percent, of the active online universe. That means that the growth of children online outpaces the overall growth of children in the entire U.S. A scary realization, and in 2013, I’m sure that number has freakishly grown. Growing up wired, with an all-access pass is just one of many examples driving the fast rate of growing up. Studies have also shown the rapid drop in age when it comes to hitting puberty. A recent study

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I definitely prefer Apple over other tech brands. I like the compatibility and connection between the different devices including iPhone and laptop along with other users.” –Female, 25, IL

More than half of Millennials say they are single, and for them the hunt for love is increasingly mobile, and more niche. Binger is one dating app that wants to pair up young single homebodies and binge viewers. Rather than asking about broad interests, body details, or Facebook information, the startup would pair up users based on their Netflix viewing data, analyzing compatibility of what shows are watched, how often, when, and for how long. However, because of Netflix’s closed API, Binger can’t exist yet, so they’re running a social media petition using the hashtag #BeAloneTogether to show support for the idea. (PSFK)

Chegg, the country’s leading college textbook rental provider, is “pulling a Netflix” by handing over the majority of their print business; a major step in a plan to become a digital-only platform. The refocus on digital products goes beyond books. Based on the belief that everything students today want is online, Chegg plans to provide digital services like self-guided homework help, on-demand tutoring, college admissions research, and internship placement. Building a relationship with students is the goal, and several other platforms are making similar shifts. (Fast Company)

Millennials' “rebellious” fashion habits are taking a toll on traditionally successful retailers. Companies like Macy’s, Michael Kors, C .Wonder, and Abercrombie & Fitch face identity and financial crises as they’ve drastically lost their coolness factor and popularity over the past few years. The “atheleisure” trend, essentially wearing leisure or work out gear in places that previous generations would have dressed up, has potentially been a factor. Athletic retailers are thriving where “department and discount stores are struggling,” and the trend of being constantly casual is too comfortable to go away anytime soon. (Business Insider)

Millennials are becoming the new generation of parents, and there is a growing divide among parenting styles—perhaps most dramatically between helicopter and “free-range” parenting. Fear of abduction and abandonment has shaped hyper-protective parenting styles and shifted the collective expectation of what it means to be a “responsible, devoted parent.” Although crime has decreased in the past two decades, a recent poll found that 19% thought an unsupervised child in public might be abducted, and over 23% believed that more bad things happen today than when they were growing up. The pressure to be an ever-present parent is strong, with those who leave kids unattended facing legal ramifications and judgment. (Mashable)

To Millennials there’s no such thing as selling out, and more brands than ever are providing opportunities to give the next generation of artists a leg up, and increase their own cool cred in the process. Sour Patch Kids is doing just that with “Brooklyn Patch,“ a tricked-out artist crash pad that offers artists on tour somewhere fun and comfortable to stay for free. In exchange, when resident indie bands like Deer Tick upload digital content—tweets, YouTube videos, Instagram photos, Tumblr posts—during their stay, they use the hashtag #BrooklynPatch. The brand’s goal is reportedly for Sour Patch Kids to become “a part of conversations in culture.” (Vulture)

What if you could collect all the Millennial insights, data, and news that are most relevant to you in one easily accessed spot? Oh wait, you can! On Ypulse.com, the My Library tab is a personalized hub of Millennial content for our Bronze, Silver, and Gold subscribers. Clicking on the star icons next to any insight article, news feed item, or instant poll stat on the site immediately stores them on My Library, creating a repository of relevant information—curated by you. (Ypulse)

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