The Friday Don’t Miss List

Check out what Millennials have been saying, doing, and seeing this week in our round-up of topics that we covered along with what’s trending. In case you missed it…

 

 

 

 


1. The Comical State of Millennials
We covered the satirical comic from Millennial Matt Bors in this week’s Essentials, but the artist is far from finished with his generational commentary. Bors posted a follow-up on his blog referring to the share numbers for the comic strip, which reached 117,000 on Facebook and garnered 5,879 comments so far, essentially saying 'I told you so' to CNN’s editors who have been reluctant to post comics for years. Expect to see more from Bors and make sure not to miss his next post about unpaid internships.

2. Brooklyn is the New “It” Girl
This week’s Essentials also mentioned the “Brooklyn Girl” as a blanket stereotype for female hipsters, and apparently “Brooklynification” will live on in pop culture for the time being. Don’t miss one Millennial who is super annoyed, noting that hipsters are everywhere: Portland, Chicago, LA, and “Brooklyn didn’t invent the Brooklyn Girl.”

 


3. Don’t Quit Cable Just Yet
We told you about the wave of Millennial-focused TV networks, so don’t miss newcomer Pivot who is fighting for the top spot. With a focus on social advocacy and creative content, Pivot will debut 300 hours of original programming including Please Like Me, a scripted series that centers on an Australian 21-year-old. If the cult popularity of HBO’s Aussie-teen-filled Summer Heights High is any indication of the show’s potential for success, Pivot could become a favorite. Did we mention Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s variety show on the network? 99 days left and counting.
 
4. Surprise! These Are a Few of Your Favorite Things
Our article on innovative small…

 
 
Ask Millennials some questions.
Log in to get started...

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “This year for Halloween I’m going to watch cooking theme shows like Halloween Wars.” –Female, 15, TX 

Millennials are clearly disenchanted with politics. When a recent poll asked who they blame the “political gridlock” in Washington on, 56% of 18-29-year-olds said “all of them.” These young consumers are also more likely to volunteer than to vote in the midterm elections. Interestingly, of the small percentage who say they definitely will vote, 51% said they would vote Republican, versus 47% who said they would vote Democrat. (The Atlantic)

It seems that more kids than ever have allergies these days, and for these ingredient-sensitive children, trick-or-treating can be less fun. (Imagine handing over the majority of your candy at the end of the night? No thanks.) This year, The Teal Pumpkin Project is campaigning to raise awareness about these allergies: houses displaying a teal pumpkin signal to trick-or-treaters that nonfood treats are being handed out. Since launching on Facebook earlier this month, the campaign has “reached more than 5.5 million people and been shared 55,000 times,” and over 2,000 pictures on Instagram have been tagged #TealPumpkinProject. (Inc.)

R.L. Stine’s scary Goosebumps and Fear Street series delighted and terrified tons of ‘90s kids, and the author has given these nostalgic consumers a Halloween treat. For the third year in a row, Stine has written an entirely new horror story on Twitter in a series of 15 tweets. The story, “What’s In My Sandwich,” has spread far beyond his 134,000 followers, and is being reposted around the web. (JezebelBuzzfeed)

Marketing on visual social platforms—Snapshot Marketing— has very quickly become an essential way to reach young consumers, and now it’s being put in motion: as of today, Instagram video ads are live. Disney, Activision, Banana Republic, the CW, and Lancome are the first brands to purchase these 15-second auto-display spots on the network. Disney and Activision are both featuring clips from recent entertainment, while Banana Republic has utilized Hyperlapse to create a clip animating fashion sketches. Meanwhile, Snapchat sold its first video ad to Universal this month for the movie Ouija, which went on to win at the box office thanks to teens. (Adweek)

Since launching in 2011, Hello Giggles has not only earned 12 million unique views a month and a very healthy social following, it has also become "an incubator for young talent.” The site emphasizes positivity and girl power, and has built a community of over 600 young female writers, journalists, and creatives who both submit work to the site and support it on Instagram and Twitter. Giggles serves as somewhat as a resume for these women, many of whom have not yet entered the workforce. (Fast Company)

We don’t just deliver data. Along with our bi-weekly survey result data files, we provide our Gold subscribers with a topline report that synthesizes hand-picked, illuminating data points and our insights and expertise. Interesting differences between males and females, older and younger Millennials, ethnicities, and more are highlighted, and relevant statistics are streamlined into an easily consumed, concise, visual takeaway. (Ypulse)

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies