Teen Mag Roundup

Not a teen mag subscriber? You're in luck. We've flipped through the pages of Teen Vogue, Seventeen, and NYLON to keep you in touch with what trends are rising among teens and their idols.

TEEN VOGUE
 
Real Teen Queen: Lorde has become a household name in less than a year, and her goth pop aura is only a stage front for the “self-awareness, humility, and, yes, even awkwardness” that make up her unlikely girl-next-door appeal. The fact that she admits to acne struggles and remembers that “not long ago I had 500 Twitter followers” makes her as real of a celebrity as they come, and appeals to Millennials’ cravings for imperfect celebrity idols.
 
Fashion’s Blurred Lines: Women in tailored tuxes, men in skirts: androgynous dressing has evolved into a full-on style switch for some. The trickle-down from runway and street to mainstream has been seen in seasons past with oversized men’s watches and button-ups for females, and now young guys like Justin Bieber and Jaden Smith are donning baggy, skirt-like silhouettes created by forward-thinking brands like Hood by Air, which made waves during fashion week this winter with a gender bending promotion.
 
Young Talent Series: Teen Vogue will be debuting the new series Strictly Ballet on its YouTube channel, which will follow six young students at the School of American Ballet as they train and fight for a spot in the acclaimed New York City Ballet. Learning the ins and outs of young performers following their dreams may inspire others to follow suit, and will give light to the dedication and sport of ballet that other brands, like Free People, have struggled to represent.
 
Dreams Into Reality: Years ago, college students were ushered into practical majors that would guarantee a stable position in the job market, but many urban-based young grads…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I put off/dread calling people in general. Everything should be done online by this time!” –Female, 30, FL 

In a continued effort to draw back the teen consumers they’ve lost, Abercrombie & Fitch’s logo will “be dead” in U.S. stores by 2015. Globally, the Abercrombie and Hollister logos and names will still be used on designs, but will be phased out here where the brand knows it is no longer considered a status symbol. Abercrombie’s sales continue to fall, and the retailer is making efforts to appeal to a different youth mentality by removing references to “Ivy League heritage,” making the brand “totally accessible,” and toning down the club-like atmosphere in-store. (BuzzFeed)

Following heartbreaking stories of the death of toddlers forgotten by their parents in hot cars, automakers made claims that they would be working on new technology to help prevent the tragedies. But years later that technology has not been produced, so parents and teens are developing it instead. Independent entrepreneurs are working on a slew of solutions for baby on board tech that would stop hot-car deaths, including car seat sensors, smartphone apps, and low-tech solutions. Many are seeking backing on crowdfunding sites to make their products a reality. (Washington Post)

Ck one was an iconic ‘90s product, but the brand has kept up with the youth market in order to stay relevant with a new generation. The fragrance, celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, relies on social media platforms, including Snapchat andTumblr, to attract Millennials and stay engaged. When creating their latest TV ad, they invited all participating talent to take behind-the-scenes pictures, selfies, and video, which were then used to “seed” the new campaign on social. The Snapchat campaign has “seen more than 1 million views in just a month and a half.” (Mediapost)

Just a few years ago, Hollywood was incredulous that YouTube was anything more than a collection of amateur vloggers, and certainly most didn’t believe that it would change the traditional entertainment world. But now, YouTube has become a “Hollywood hit factory” for teen entertainment. Smaller companies that realized the platform’s potential early have grown massively, big studios are snapping up YouTube studios to get in on the action, and programming is in the midst of  “rapid consolidation.” Our social media trend tracker shows that as of March 2014, YouTube has become the number one platform teens use, with 89% telling us they use the video site compared to 80% who say they use Facebook. (Businessweek)

Earlier this summer, a report that fewer teens were interested in getting summer jobs than ever before had older generations rolling their eyes at the slacker youth who “don’t want to work.” But new research indicates that it might not just be that lazy kids these days want to spend their summers taking selfies: It could be that teen jobs don’t pay off the way they used to. Millennials with summer jobs don’t see the future wage increase that teens in the ‘70s and ‘80s did. (Vox

Every day we deliver Millennial insights to your inbox, but every quarter, we look at some of the larger trends happening within the generation—and why they matter to brands. Our Gold subscribers have access to the Ypulse Quarterly report, an in-the-know guide to Millennials that synthesizes the major trends and stats we’ve seen over the last quarter of the year. We take a close look at the "why behind the what" and provide in-action examples and supportive data, along with implications for you to take away. (Ypulse)

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