Reassessing Millennials at the Ypulse Mashup

An announcement from Ypulse President Dan Coates:

Last month Ypulse celebrated our ninth birthday. For the past nine years, we've been thinking about, talking about, writing about and researching members of the Millennial generation or, as we used to say much more often than we do nowadays, Gen Y. As we look back, it's gratifying to see how what was once a niche topic that required a great deal of effort in order to attract attention has since become central to the marketing plans of so many marketers and communicators.

During the course of the nine-year dialogue, Millennials themselves have changed. They've "aged up," with the midpoint of the generation now 20 years of age. They've faced the greatest economic downturn since the Great Depression. They've watched their parents struggle to support them and their families. A conversation that was once adolescent and teen-centric has developed a number of new facets as Millennials catapult toward adulthood: politics, education, economy, career and, most recently, parenthood. These emerging frontiers of the Millennial experience are new, exciting and challenging. While we feel that we've developed a pretty solid understanding of the fundamental values of the largest generation in American history, it's both energizing and rewarding to see how our understanding is pressure tested daily as Millennials evolve. 

While Jake Katz has already written about our plans to name the generation that will follow the Millennials, we're really excited to follow that conversation with one that will shed new light on Millennials themselves. At our Ypulse Mashup: Millennials Reassessed event on June 27th, we'll reveal the details of a massive psychographic segmentation that we've undertaken that will break up this monolithic generation into smaller…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “Quite frankly there are guys clothes I like sometimes but I never could wear. I mean, I'm not a cross dresser! But if they had something in my size and shape, totally. I would buy it.” –Female, 14, OH

Three singles from Ariana Grande’s sophomore album My Everything have already infiltrated the top 10 on iTunes before its release, but she is going beyond online hype for a triple marketing threat. The 21-year-old will appear with Jessie J and Nicki Minaj in a 2-part commercial that tells the story of a night out and its aftermath using clips from their music video collaboration. The commercials, branded with Beats and Target, will air during the MTV VMAs where Grande will also perform live, all one day before the album drops. (WSJ)

SoundCloud is going the way of Spotify by introducing a tiered subscription service that will also bring advertising (read: revenue) to the platform. The first Partner tier offers helpful feedback and basic statistic tools and will be free for the 10 million plus creators heard on SoundCloud each year. This announcement comes months after new streaming services like Beats Music flooded the market, and its latecomer status may prove helpful for Millennial listeners who are already accustomed to in-app ads or paying to opt out. (TechCrunch)

First pizza becomes a one-button business, and now video editing is being democratized for the masses with new app Fly that “makes big-time, Cannes-ready cutting room floor techniques as simple and intuitive as a flick of the finger.” The one-touch, video editing app makes simple edits like cuts and transitions, but also allows users to put videos side-by-side and stitch together different cameras to capture multiple viewpoints of an event. (Netted)

Millennials have been experiencing a disconnect with “luxury,”and Louis Vuitton has been seeing declining sales across Asia despite its prominence and ubiquity with global consumers. To hold onto its market, LVMH is diversifying into entertainment, specifically into K-pop. The company has bought millions of shares in South Korea’s YG Entertainment, one of the major players in K-pop’s explosion and the same enterprise that represents the genre’s hottest stars and fashion icons: Psy and G-Dragon. (Quartz)

Approximately $458 million was spent last year investing in wearable tech, but as product offerings become more diverse across patches, watches, and clothes, they’re losing a focused purpose and the attention of the general Millennial buyer. In a study from textbook service Chegg, out of 1,000 college students, 67% had not even heard of the term “wearables,” and of the 18% who do own a wearable device, the majority had bought inexpensive activity trackers. (PandoDaily)

Quote of the Day: "An athletic hoodie never goes out of style according to me. It's easy, can get dirty, and you'll show a bit of school pride. Besides, no one expects you to look top dollar every day in graduate school.” –Male, 27, MD

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