What’s The Next…

What’s the next Harry Potter? What’s the next True Blood? What's the next Hunger Games? As soon as the light of the latest entertainment franchise fades (and sometimes well before it does) we start to hear “what’s the next” questions. With so much of major pop culture coming out of youth culture and YA literature, we try to keep our finger on the pulse of the next big things to watch. When it comes to brands taking advantage of the next big entertainment craze, one of the keys is to be aware and be ready early. With that in mind, we’re giving you a rundown of the entertainment properties that are already gaining buzz and could be future major hits.
 

 

 


Could be the next Life of Pi


The Giver
This YA novel by Lois Lowry came out in 1994 but is considered a modern classic by many, and has been trapped in pre-production purgatory—until now. Oscar winner Jeff Bridges has been trying to make the book into a feature for years, and will produce and star as the original Giver in the film, which could begin filming late this summer. Brenton Twaites, a young Australian actor who is currently not well known in the states has been cast as the main character, Jonas. (He will also be starring in next year’s Sleeping Beauty adaptation Maleficent, and is definitely a young actor to watch.) Though The Giver is dystopian and dark, the movie won’t likely be as action-packed as Hunger Games, as much of the action takes place in the main character’s head as he lives through memories. Like Life of Pi it’s a one-off book about a male protagonist dealing with some heady and dangerous issues, and has the potential to be both beautiful to watch and heart-wrenching.

Why it could (probably will) be big: Millennials from ages 32 to 12 have all likely read The Giver, and it doesn’t take much…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I think one of the coolest devices is actually the film camera because it kind of brings you back to another time. There's also a different kind of quality to the film camera.” -Female, 21, TN

Millennials covet discovering something new, and Atlas Obscura, a travel and discovery media company, is keeping that in mind as they target those members of the generation with an “insatiable curiosity and adventurous spirit.” The site’s more niche, obscure, yet intriguing content, like “Touring the Tombs” and “Nine Amazing Takes on Treehouses,” sets it apart from other Millennial-focused publishing platforms. With $2 million in funding, it now plans to expand from user-generated travel topics to areas like food and history. The company’s popular real-life events also make it more appealing to younger consumers, who are looking for something unique to do in the offline world. (DigidayAtlas Obscura)

America’s sweet tooth isn’t as big as it used to be, and younger diners are even less likely to indulge in desserts. A recent report found that only 12% of dinners eaten at home include a dessert, which is down from 15% 10 years ago, and only 9% of 18-34-year-olds are eating dessert with dinner, compared to 19% of those 55 and up. More healthful eating could be hampering dessert’s position at the dinner table, and a December 2014 Ypulse monthly survey found that 49% of Millennials consider nutritional information when grocery shopping. (USA Today)

To effectively sell kids’ products and content, understanding the new generation of parents is essential, and Millennials are becoming the influential parenting majority. A “Proprietary Survey of Moms” states that Millennial parents and their children are accustomed to being “hyper connected, with on demand content available with the ‘swipe’ of a finger and a mobile device.” This generation of families also seems to love products that have a link to the content they watch. It’s estimated that between 25% and 50% of toy purchases in the U.S. are now related to entertainment franchises, and 90% of moms say they bought a toy linked to one of the big movies of 2014: Frozen, Lego, Marvel, Transformers. (Quartz)

As young consumers shift the dining industry with their unique expectations, tastes, and increasing spending power, major food brands are doing everything they can think of to appeal to them—and some might not quite hit the mark. A collection of marketing and rebranding strategies that chains and brands have employed to lure Millennial customers includes redesigning to become “a chill place to be chill at,” changing to pouch packaging, calling food “artisanal,” and embracing selfie campaigns. Adding kale and, of course, sriracha everything to menu items have been common tactics to attract them as well. (Eater)

While kids of all ages are watching TV, the way they watch shifts significantly over time. Nielsen’s Total Audience Report 2015 reveals that the number of hours spent watching TV in an average week decreases as young viewers get older. The youngest viewing age group also watches far more content on their computers, with 2-11-year-olds watching almost five hours of content via computer and 18-to-24-year-olds spending 19 minutes of their average weekly viewing time the same way. However, general “web surfing” on a desktop increases as young consumers go from pre-school to high school. (Adweek)

We give you a dose of Millennial insight on a daily basis, but every quarter, we zoom our lens out to look at some of the larger trends happening within the generation—and why they matter to brands. Our Gold subscribers have access to the Ypulse Quarterly report, an in-the-know guide to Millennials that synthesizes the major trends and stats we’ve seen over the last quarter of the year. We take a close look at the "why behind the what" of big trends and provide in-action examples and supportive data, along with implications for you to take away. (Ypulse)

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