What’s The Next…

What’s the next Harry Potter? What’s the next True Blood? What's the next Hunger Games? As soon as the light of the latest entertainment franchise fades (and sometimes well before it does) we start to hear “what’s the next” questions. With so much of major pop culture coming out of youth culture and YA literature, we try to keep our finger on the pulse of the next big things to watch. When it comes to brands taking advantage of the next big entertainment craze, one of the keys is to be aware and be ready early. With that in mind, we’re giving you a rundown of the entertainment properties that are already gaining buzz and could be future major hits.
 

 

 


Could be the next Life of Pi


The Giver
This YA novel by Lois Lowry came out in 1994 but is considered a modern classic by many, and has been trapped in pre-production purgatory—until now. Oscar winner Jeff Bridges has been trying to make the book into a feature for years, and will produce and star as the original Giver in the film, which could begin filming late this summer. Brenton Twaites, a young Australian actor who is currently not well known in the states has been cast as the main character, Jonas. (He will also be starring in next year’s Sleeping Beauty adaptation Maleficent, and is definitely a young actor to watch.) Though The Giver is dystopian and dark, the movie won’t likely be as action-packed as Hunger Games, as much of the action takes place in the main character’s head as he lives through memories. Like Life of Pi it’s a one-off book about a male protagonist dealing with some heady and dangerous issues, and has the potential to be both beautiful to watch and heart-wrenching.

Why it could (probably will) be big: Millennials from ages 32 to 12 have all likely read The Giver, and it doesn’t take much…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “If a photo of me went viral, I would feel angry but…maybe I would be a little excited because it went viral, as long as the picture is not bad.” –Female, 16, TN

57% of Millennials ages 18-32 say they plan to get a new job within the next year, according to one of Ypulse’s bi-weekly Millennial surveys, fielded this June. The generation is known for their predilection for moving from job to job, and now some businesses are making “generational training” a part of their management instruction in order to keep these younger workers happy. Giving them a purpose, plenty of time off, global opportunities, and a clear career path plan within the company are all tactics being used to retain them. (Businessweek)

Back to school marketing is starting in full force, and Target is relying heavily on digital to reach college students, in more ways than one. The retailer has launched a campaign employing major YouTube stars, like Tiffany Garcia and Mikey Bolts, to sell apparel, electronics, and furnishings, featuring them in four YouTube shows that make over dorm rooms and offer decorating tips. The video series lives online so that Target can “be part of the ongoing conversation” and “go where the [M]illennial generation is.” (NYTimes)

Millennial-hate is easy to find online, where articles like “Millennials, the Friendly Cutthrout Generation” and “Millennials' Political Views Don't Make Any Sense” seem to appear on a daily basis. But how do Millennials themselves feel about the bad rap they’re getting? One Millennial’s response to some recent Millennial surveys puts things into perspective, wondering if the generation is just more likely to admit things, and whether they “are just like...everybody else?” (Gothamist)

Beyoncé is no stranger to celebrity endorsement, but her latest unexpected marketing trick goes outside the box. This weekend, the powerhouse artist teased a new 50 Shades of Grey trailer by posting a 15-second clip of it on her Instagram with a “darker remix” of her "Crazy in Love" playing as a soundtrack. The teaser was posted with the hashtag #fiftyshades, attracting the attention of both the singer’s fans and the book series’ avid fandom. (MTV)

Rosetta Stone’s new campaign is aimed at Millennials, shifting focus from the product itself to the idea that “people who learn new languages are able to share experiences with people from other places.” The ads will run on more youth-focused channels than Rosetta has appeared on before, like MTV, VH1, and Comedy Central, but the majority of the campaign will be heavily digital and social, and include online webisodes that will air on Vice. (MediaPost)

Did you know that Ypulse tracks social media trends in our biweekly surveys? We found that Vine, Twitter, and YouTube have seen steady growth since November 2013, gaining 7%, 11%, and 12% more Millennial users, respectively. Our Silver and Gold tier subscribers can find helpful visuals that detail our tracked trends in the Data Room on Ypulse.com. (Ypulse)

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