Popping Up for the Holidays: E-tailers Are Making the Leap Offline for Seasonal Shoppers

It’s a short holiday season this year, with fewer days between Thanksgiving and Christmas than usual. With the cramped shopping season, a trip to the store is feeling pretty harried and rushed for Millennials, who are also often more comfortable buying gifts from behind a screen than then getting stampeded in a store. Cyber Monday was a huge success, following a lackluster Black Friday—perhaps further solidifying the power of the online shopper. But still, shopping offline is a part of Millennials' holiday behavior—and they still plan to get out there with their shopping bags in hand. When we asked 14-29-year-olds where they planned to do the majority of their holiday shopping, 59% told us they would be shopping mostly in-store. As a generation that truly lives with one foot in the digital world and one foot out, it’s not too surprising that they plan to buy gifts that way as well, despite cries by some that they are spending all their time clicking on shopping carts instead of pushing them. Perhaps to match up with Millennials' online/offline mentalities, several online-only stores are bridging the gap into the offline shopper’s world, and bringing their wares to city sidewalks (busy sidewalks, dressed in holiday style) for the season. Here are a handful of the usually online-only brands that are (somewhat surprisingly) setting up temporary shop IRL (in real life):  

1. Amazon Sells Kindles in SF

Though Amazon is a major player in the online shopping world during the holidays—a full 91% of 14-29-year-old Millennials who planned to shop online said they would be buying gifts on Amazon— it seems dominating the shopping lists on the internet wasn’t enough this year. The massive e-tailer set up a series of pop-up shops in malls throughout San Francisco to sell their Kindle…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I haven’t had children yet because I need to finish school first.” –Female, 30, IL

Yesterday, Microsoft bought the company behind the wildly popular game Minecraft, and in doing so they’ve acquired a “multigenerational success story” and could be regaining some cool cred with younger consumers. It turns out, parents love the game, and many young Millennials and post-Millennials have embraced exploring the digital Minecraft world, hacking, building, and collaborating in the lo-fi game. (The Verge)

Yesterday, Microsoft bought the company behind the wildly popular game Minecraft, and in doing so they’ve acquired a “multigenerational success story” and could be regaining some cool cred with younger consumers. It turns out, parents love the game, and many young Millennials and post-Millennials have embraced exploring the digital Minecraft world, hacking, building, and collaborating in the lo-fi game. (The Verge)

When we asked Millennials if they would download another photo sharing app, only 17% of 18-24-year-olds said yes. Of course, if the right app caught on, they’d likely jump onboard to keep up with friends—but the truth is, it is getting harder to get consumers to try new apps. While people are spending more time on the apps they already have, especially music, fitness, and social networking apps, 65.5% in the U.S. say they aren’t downloading any in an average month. (Quartz)

Boomers grew up with protest songs as an intrinsic part of their musical culture, and sometimes like to criticize Millennials for their lack of similar tunes. But EMA’s self-released new track “False Flag” could quiet those complaints. The song talks about the experience of a generation “growing up in the shadow of 9/11,” and how that cultural turning point changed, and maybe stole, her generation’s future. (Flavorwire)

Apple’s iPhone 6 is of course the big smartphone news of the week, but while that announcement has taken over headlines, other brands are quietly innovating in the category to appeal to more niche mobile users. Panasonic has returned to the phone market, with the launch of a “connected camera,” a smartphone camera hybrid that is meant to appeal to those who are more interested in the quality of the photos they are shooting on the go than the phone features they can boast. (Engadget)

In 2013, the birth rate among women 20-24-years-old was at a record low, and it continued to decline for those 25-29-years-old. These low rates could be “here to stay,” and that might be a good thing for both Millennial moms and their kids. Working women are gaining more salary and experience with every year they delay motherhood, and their future children could have greater opportunities and even a higher lifetime income. (Bloomberg)

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