Olympic Sex Symbols

FHM cover While the original Olympics may have included naked athletes, the current Olympics is definitely coming close to that ideal—especially in sports like beach volleyball. I’m always checking Yahoo! to see what stories and photos are “most popular” online and for the past two weeks its been homoerotic photos female Olympic athletes embracing after victory, patting each other on the…you get the picture. I guess teens get the picture, too. Buzz Marketing sent over a nice summary of how this year’s Olympic games and the subsequent ads and sponsorships featuring athlestes may have crossed the line between sexiness and lack of taste.

From their release:

“High Jumper Amy Akuffa has posed for Playboy, and then partnered with
volleyball player Logan Tom, long jumper Jenny Adams and swimmers
Amanda Beard and Haley Cope for a seductive FHM cover.  But it is not just the women that are sexy- swimmer Ian Thorpe has started an underwear line.”

Buzz’s Blue Fusion research division asked their teens what they thought of the sexiness factor in this year’s Olympics and found “Gen-Y appreciates an athlete who’s not in a regular sport like football or basketball, but the use of heavy sex appeal is transparent to the savvy teen viewers.” Basically all this skin is rubbing today’s now modest/preppy/conservative teens the wrong way.

“While watching the male swimmers splash to the finish line at the
Olympics, one thing was on my mind - why were their swimming trunks so low and tight?...Are they trying to be the next breed of athletes turned sex symbols?...(Making their sport top priority) instead of a Hollywood/sex symbol/make more money attitude I truly believe would make them more sexy.”

Danasia, 17, Ft. Lauderdale

 

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: Q: “Why haven’t you had children yet?” A: “I’m gay. So having a child is a big decision.” –Male, 22, CA

Back to school shopping is moving slower than usual this year, but that’s not the only shift that retailers need to contend with. We outlined the top five categories for spending among high school and college students this season, and tech is in the number one slot for college students and a close second for high schoolers. Increasingly, getting the latest headphones or mobile tech is just more important to young consumers than getting the latest fashions. As one teen told the Times, “It’s definitely more exciting for a lot of teenagers to have a new phone that can do lots of cool stuff than clothing.” (NYTimes)

When Millennials are shopping, more and more prefer to pay with plastic, with debit cards as their main payment of choice. A recent survey by CreditCards.com found that debit cards are preferred 3-to-1 over credit cards among consumers 18-29-years-old—a finding that makes sense considering this group’s fear of debt and cautious financial outlook. Cash is gradually being ignored in favor of debit as well. Among the same group, 51% prefer plastic over cash for purchases under $5, compared with 82% of consumers over 65 who use cash for under $5 purchases. (CNBC)

Our social media status update made it clear that the big platforms are spinning out plenty of new stand alone apps to test new features and try to attract young consumers. Now Instagram has introduced yet another. Their new Hyperlapse is an app that speeds up and stabilizes video, creating beautiful, impressive looking shorts that can be shared to Facebook or Instagram. There is already a #hyperlapse tag that users are employing to share their creations. Time will tell if the app is useful and interesting enough to stand on its own. (Fast Company)

“Everybody is trying to hack Instagram.” That’s what Like2Buy’s cofounder says, and they’re finding ways to help retailers turn social media love into real sales. Target and Nordstrom are both using Like2Buy platforms that link photos posted directly to product pages to buy if they are interested. The hope is that the integration will provide a more seamless experience between browsing Instagram and shopping, and give young consumers the “speed and convenience” that they expect in all facets of brand interactions. (Brandchannel

In the wake of the crisis in Ferguson, two Georgia teens have turned to tech to try to make a difference, and invented an app to help prevent police brutality. Five-O is “like Yelp,” and allows users to create incident reports about their interactions with officers, giving them a grade. The app also includes a “Know Your Rights” function to that users can easily look up what rights they have when dealing with the law. The two sisters behind the app had “dabbled” in code before, and are planning on releasing more apps in the future. (NYMag)

Looking for a quick Millennial stat to get you up to speed before a strategy session? Searching Ypulse is the best place to start! Silver and Gold members have access to 10,000+ articles, 20,000+ curated Millennial news items, 2 billion peer-generated opinions from our mobile, social Q&A network, and thousands of statistics on Millennials drawn from our bi-weekly national survey of the generation. You search can begin and end with us. (Ypulse)

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