Monthly Teen Mag Roundup

It’s a new year and a new chance to shake up your style! Millennials are certainly doing so in selecting bold and creative clothes that celebrate individuality. They aren’t afraid to take risks and are revolutionizing the traditional standards of beauty, as well as how magazines are read. Just take a look at the latest issues of Teen Vogue and Seventeen for proof…

AnnaSophia Robb Teen Vogue February 2012AnnaSophia Robb, who’s proving to be the next “It Girl,” graces the cover of the latest issue of Teen Vogue. Her rising status is partially due to her coveted role as a young Carrie Bradshaw in “The Carrie Diaries,” the prequel to “Sex and the City” premiering on the CW next week.  AnnaSophia plays Carrie during high school, as she discovers herself, falls in love with NYC, and enters the world of dating. The magazine is packed with content about AnnaSophia, as well as the can’t-miss show, and tons of fashion that would surely make Carrie Bradshaw swoon.

However, the most noteworthy aspect of this issue is the emphasis on edgy styles. Millennials are putting more effort than ever before on being an individual and using fashion as a form of self-expression. A spread on teen bloggers highlights some of the most creative girls who aren’t afraid to show off their original and eclectic styles. Teens and twentysomethings are embracing clothes with character, which we’ll see even more of this spring. Teen Vogue highlights Mary Katrantzou’s collection for Current/Elliott, which includes jeans with postage-stamp and bank-note prints, as well as Liberty London and AG Adriano Goldschmied’s denim with floral designs. In fact, all types of denim, even denim on denim, will be in this season.

But besides wearing unique patterns or bold colors, young people are behind the shift in fashion, where style is about expressing yourself and…

 
 
Ask Millennials some questions.
Log in to get started...

Want to talk to us about the article
or dive into a custom study?


Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I hope to be a good person that can change the world for the better. I want to be an artist and an author and a musician in my free time, and be a veterinarian as my profession.” —Female, 15, WA

Xers and Boomers may look down upon the growing subset of Millennials moving back in with mom and dad, but instead of feeling bad for themselves, these kids are making it work. A closer look at their post-grad lives is being explored in Boomerang Kids—a photojournalist series inspired by one Millennial’s experience of moving back home after draining resources as a photography assistant. The juxtaposition of reaching towards adulthood while still living in their childhood rooms paints a fuller picture of how many are living day-to-day. (Fast Company

Wendy’s may be tainting the comeback of one of their most popular items—the pretzel bun—in a #PretzelLoveSongs commercial being called out for “lazy parodying.” Those who feel nostalgic for the ‘90s hit song “To Be With You” are cringing over the Wendy’s commercial remake, and voicing their extreme distaste on Twitter. Be careful playing with Millennials’ nostalgia, because not taking it seriously could land a brand in hot water. (Uproxx)

How can we make kids exercise more? Since dragging them away from their screens is more difficult than ever, Wokamon is a new app from China that is making kids bring their devices outside and take a walk in order to feed their virtual pets. The cute aliens feed on energy, and the app’s pedometer technology measures steps, distance, and calories that add up to advance pets to new levels and unlock characters. Though targeted to kids, teens and adults can benefit from the app’s fun approach to fitness and sync it with other wearable trackers. (Springwise)

One mom’s open letter to Lands’ End asking why there have been cool science shirts designed for boys but not for girls has quickly gained momentum online with other parents this month, and pushed the brand to launch an entirely new line of science-themed tees for girls who love NASA, sharks, and the like. The brand has been accused of gender stereotyping in the past, and is addressing the posts on its Facebook page directly by rolling out new science-themed styles for girls this fall. (Huffington Post)

Digital versus unplugged is the wedding debate of late, and the line between too tech-centric and being completely disconnected is one that brides and grooms are finding difficult to straddle. Social media is increasingly being used to create wedding albums via couple-specific hashtags, but some couples are so turned off by the near constant focus on camera phones during a wedding that they are enforcing device-free ceremonies. (NYT)

Quote of the Day: "A benefit of unplugging is getting a more personal view of the world back. (Social media tends to distort your perception to bend to what others are thinking/feeling/saying/doing.)” —Female, 25, MN

Sign Up Now

Subscribe for premium access to our content, data, and tools.

Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Upgrade Now

Upgrade for full access to the best marketing tools for understanding the next generation.

View our Client Case Studies