“Little Things” Marketers Can Learn From 1D World: The One Direction Pop-Up Store

One Direction 2Want to reach tween and teen girls? Seeking to enhance your retail environment to better engage Millennial shoppers? Take a cue from 1D World, the One Direction pop-up shop that opened in New York City several weeks ago. Fans across the country have been buzzing about the store and the chance to be immersed in the world of 1D — literally! The store succeeds not only because it sells all things any Directioner would dream of, but because it creates an experience for consumers. Youth seek this when shopping because they want to socialize and be entertained in a store. If a store achieves this — which 1D World certainly does — Millennials will regard it as a cool place to hang out and they’ll encourage their friends to as well.

From the moment one enters 1D World, appropriately placed next to Madison Square Garden, it’s clear that it’s a party! Music is blasting, as expected given the purpose of the store, and shoppers feel like they’re part of a special space where all Directioners can share their love of the band. The name of the store even draws them in further; it’s not called 1D Holiday Shop or 1D Pop-Up Store. Instead, it evokes how the culture of being a Directioner is its own special world or club.

While this particular store is unique, it provides an example of how retailers can reach Millennials. Music is essential to young adults (67% say they'd feel lost without it according to our Entertainment Lifeline Report), so by setting up the right atmosphere or letting fans choose the sounds, stores can immediately capture their attention and keep them inside longer. Moreover, the name of a section can impact how a store is perceived. A junior’s department may not be a cool place to hang out or shop, but an area called a lounge may have more appeal.One Direction

Beyond the basics, the walls…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Millennials have a different approach to buying food than previous generations, and they are changing the way that grocery shopping is done. These foodies are more likely to plan their shopping around a specific recipe they’re planning to cook, to buy ingredients the same day they’re preparing a meal, and look for minimally processed and locally grown food and beverages. Their preferences put pressure on big-box stores and traditional groceries who need to adapt to attract the new generation of shopper. (Washington Post)

We don’t just deliver data. Along with our bi-weekly survey result data files, we provide our Gold subscribers with a topline report that synthesizes hand-picked, illuminating data points and our insights and expertise. Interesting differences between males and females, older and younger Millennials, ethnicities, and more are highlighted, and relevant statistics are streamlined into an easily consumed, concise, visual takeaway. (Ypulse)

Quote of the Day: “I put off/dread calling people in general. Everything should be done online by this time!” –Female, 30, FL 

In a continued effort to draw back the teen consumers they’ve lost, Abercrombie & Fitch’s logo will “be dead” in U.S. stores by 2015. Globally, the Abercrombie and Hollister logos and names will still be used on designs, but will be phased out here where the brand knows it is no longer considered a status symbol. Abercrombie’s sales continue to fall, and the retailer is making efforts to appeal to a different youth mentality by removing references to “Ivy League heritage,” making the brand “totally accessible,” and toning down the club-like atmosphere in-store. (BuzzFeed)

Following heartbreaking stories of the death of toddlers forgotten by their parents in hot cars, automakers made claims that they would be working on new technology to help prevent the tragedies. But years later that technology has not been produced, so parents and teens are developing it instead. Independent entrepreneurs are working on a slew of solutions for baby on board tech that would stop hot-car deaths, including car seat sensors, smartphone apps, and low-tech solutions. Many are seeking backing on crowdfunding sites to make their products a reality. (Washington Post)

Ck one was an iconic ‘90s product, but the brand has kept up with the youth market in order to stay relevant with a new generation. The fragrance, celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, relies on social media platforms, including Snapchat andTumblr, to attract Millennials and stay engaged. When creating their latest TV ad, they invited all participating talent to take behind-the-scenes pictures, selfies, and video, which were then used to “seed” the new campaign on social. The Snapchat campaign has “seen more than 1 million views in just a month and a half.” (Mediapost)

Just a few years ago, Hollywood was incredulous that YouTube was anything more than a collection of amateur vloggers, and certainly most didn’t believe that it would change the traditional entertainment world. But now, YouTube has become a “Hollywood hit factory” for teen entertainment. Smaller companies that realized the platform’s potential early have grown massively, big studios are snapping up YouTube studios to get in on the action, and programming is in the midst of  “rapid consolidation.” Our social media trend tracker shows that as of March 2014, YouTube has become the number one platform teens use, with 89% telling us they use the video site compared to 80% who say they use Facebook. (Businessweek)

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