HBO’s ‘Girls’: What The Real Girls Think

Today’s post comes to us from Camilla, a recent grad who weighed in on HBO's "Girls," a show that's caused much discussion and debate about how it depicts Millennials. Camilla, like us, has a love/hate relationship with the show because unlike many programs, it highlights the harsh realities that Gen Y faces. It doesn't represent all Millennials in its attempt to portray today's tough economy, but it shows young adults' struggles with unemployment, underemployment, and the everyday challenges they encounter, and their responses to them. Sure this is representative — or at least more than other programs — as Camilla explains, but she and her peers aren't sure it's a show they want to watch since it presents the low points of their lives.

HBO’s ‘Girls’: What The Real Girls Think

I think I’m the target audience for HBO’s “Girls.” At face value, it depicts the major life themes of my peers, who all just graduated from college, moved to the nearest metropolis (in my case, London, but close enough), and set about trying to figure out their lives — but mainly just how to pay their rent. No, most of us aren’t doing what we wish were doing, or earning much (or any) money for it. Yes, we might have “dated” someone without ever having gone on a date. And most of all, yes, we’re completely terrified about the economy — though still not as much as we’re terrified of STDs. All these themes ring true, but if I’ve gleaned anything from my friends’ reactions to “Girls,” the truth is not quite what our generation is looking for in our TV shows.

In the pilot episode, the star/writer/creator/whatever of the show, Lena Dunham, plays the protagonist, Hannah, a 24-year-old with an unpaid internship in New York, just about to be cut off financially from her college professor parents. The rest of the…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “In the future, I'd like to pay off my student loans and not starve or get evicted. A stable job would be nice.” –Male, 26, PA

With any large-scale marketing campaign, especially those that encourage consumer participation, brands must prepare for their message to be hijacked. Coke’s #ShareaCoke promotion has gotten the royal hack treatment from Millennials online who are making fun of the names found listed on the bottles (or those that are left out) and filling in their own to create new comic pairings that relate to other memes. (Adweek)

Not all viral sensations make sense at first. Take relatively unknown British teen Tish and the Vine she posted recently. In it, Tish sits in her mom’s car pretending to drive, says “broom broom,” and cuts to her mom’s high pitched voice saying, “Get out me car!” Sounds simple and not all that overwhelming, but since it was posted, the Vine has gone viral, been remixed by fans, and has earned its own #TeamTish hashtag. Tish’s viral potential could be due her monotone voice, silly catch phrase, or quirky mom, but either way, her videos have given teens online someone to root for. (BuzzFeed)

Live-stream gaming service Twitch has grown from 3.2 million users to 50 million users in three years time and its earnings potential has caught the eye of Google, who plans to purchase Twitch and integrate it into YouTube. Watching how others play and strategize “is like catnip” for serious gamers and Twitch makes it easy for gamers to live-stream what they’re playing for audiences to watch, regardless of what console they’re using. (MediaPost)

You may not be the biggest fan of “listicle” editorials pieces, but BuzzFeed, whose traffic is 50% on mobile and 75% referred from social media, makes a strong case for why lists and other themes are important in brand writing for Millennials. Branded quizzes on BuzzFeed have a 96% completion rate, and both lists and quizzes signal to busy readers that there is “finiteness to what they’re getting.” They are also discovering something new about themselves through quizzes, feeding into their Numbers Game desire to use data for self-discovery. (The Drum)

100 fans will earn a seat at The Giver premier in close proximity to the movie’s biggest stars, but this competition isn’t about luck. The Giver Movie Premiere for Good contest is using online activism as its backbone, asking fans to launch fundraising campaigns on Crowdrise and raise money in order to secure their spot. So far around $6,000 has been raised from the more than 400 campaigns with the money going to charities benefitting the arts. (Mashable)

Quote of the Day: “My dream for the future is complete financial independence from parents and any others, and a very satisfying career that I enjoy (a high salary would be a plus, but not essential).” –Male, 25, PA

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