Best Of 2012: Fashion

To conclude our Year in Review coverage, Youth Advisory Board member Emily Smucker looks back at the top fashion of 2012. Many of the trends we saw this past year are modern updates of past styles and like Emily, we hope many of these fashion trends are still in style in 2013!

Best of 2012: Fashon

Fashions come and go, and the things that get us excited this year may have us laughing in twenty five years. However, we had some stellar fashions in 2012. This is a list of the best fashion trends of the year, trends which are so lovely that I predict that even if they fall out of fashion, you might as well keep the items in your closet because you can be sure they’ll come back in style someday.

Lace

Lace ClothingOf all the trends this year, lace is the one I can get behind 100%. In and of itself, lace is pretty, feminine, and delicate. However, lace can also be edgy when paired with the right things. But most of all, lace is a classic. It has been around for centuries. As such, many of the items we snatch up today can be worn for years and years without looking dated.

Color blocking

Everyone was color blocking this year, and I loved it. I love the creativity, the eye-popping colors, and the way it encourages people to pair things up which they normally wouldn’t pair up, expanding the options in their wardrobe. However, problems do arrive when people start color-blocking colors that look terrible together.

GlitterGlitter Clothes

A year and a half ago, I found a pair of glittery flip-flops at a thrift store, and loved them so much I desperately hoped glitter would come in style so I could stock up on more glittery items. What do you know, it did! This trend is obviously not for everyone, but those who can pull it off should definitely be stocking up. Too much glitter looks cheap, but having one article…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “I put off/dread calling people in general. Everything should be done online by this time!” –Female, 30, FL 

In a continued effort to draw back the teen consumers they’ve lost, Abercrombie & Fitch’s logo will “be dead” in U.S. stores by 2015. Globally, the Abercrombie and Hollister logos and names will still be used on designs, but will be phased out here where the brand knows it is no longer considered a status symbol. Abercrombie’s sales continue to fall, and the retailer is making efforts to appeal to a different youth mentality by removing references to “Ivy League heritage,” making the brand “totally accessible,” and toning down the club-like atmosphere in-store. (BuzzFeed)

Following heartbreaking stories of the death of toddlers forgotten by their parents in hot cars, automakers made claims that they would be working on new technology to help prevent the tragedies. But years later that technology has not been produced, so parents and teens are developing it instead. Independent entrepreneurs are working on a slew of solutions for baby on board tech that would stop hot-car deaths, including car seat sensors, smartphone apps, and low-tech solutions. Many are seeking backing on crowdfunding sites to make their products a reality. (Washington Post)

Ck one was an iconic ‘90s product, but the brand has kept up with the youth market in order to stay relevant with a new generation. The fragrance, celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, relies on social media platforms, including Snapchat andTumblr, to attract Millennials and stay engaged. When creating their latest TV ad, they invited all participating talent to take behind-the-scenes pictures, selfies, and video, which were then used to “seed” the new campaign on social. The Snapchat campaign has “seen more than 1 million views in just a month and a half.” (Mediapost)

Just a few years ago, Hollywood was incredulous that YouTube was anything more than a collection of amateur vloggers, and certainly most didn’t believe that it would change the traditional entertainment world. But now, YouTube has become a “Hollywood hit factory” for teen entertainment. Smaller companies that realized the platform’s potential early have grown massively, big studios are snapping up YouTube studios to get in on the action, and programming is in the midst of  “rapid consolidation.” Our social media trend tracker shows that as of March 2014, YouTube has become the number one platform teens use, with 89% telling us they use the video site compared to 80% who say they use Facebook. (Businessweek)

Earlier this summer, a report that fewer teens were interested in getting summer jobs than ever before had older generations rolling their eyes at the slacker youth who “don’t want to work.” But new research indicates that it might not just be that lazy kids these days want to spend their summers taking selfies: It could be that teen jobs don’t pay off the way they used to. Millennials with summer jobs don’t see the future wage increase that teens in the ‘70s and ‘80s did. (Vox

Every day we deliver Millennial insights to your inbox, but every quarter, we look at some of the larger trends happening within the generation—and why they matter to brands. Our Gold subscribers have access to the Ypulse Quarterly report, an in-the-know guide to Millennials that synthesizes the major trends and stats we’ve seen over the last quarter of the year. We take a close look at the "why behind the what" and provide in-action examples and supportive data, along with implications for you to take away. (Ypulse)

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