A Different Side of Global Millennials: The Friday Don’t Miss List

This week we're following up with content you might have missed in maker culture, global trends, tech, and the workplace with a Millennial focused eye.

1. Mommy on the Job? Maybe Not
In our Essentials this week, we let you know about brands like PepsiCo and LinkedIn that are incorporating Millennials’ parents into the hiring process, but warned that “bring-your-parents-to-work-day” may not be fun for everyone. Don’t miss the reactions to the original article that serve to either explain or mock this new trend. Millennials are indeed closer to their parents than generations before them, and while sociological changes are underway as they fill the workforce, older generations can’t help but scoff at the implications of helicopter parenting in the workplace.
 
2.  A Different Side of Global Millennials
This week’s guest post from JWT MENA introduced you to the Mipsterz—a sub-culture of Millennial Muslims who are challenging long-held Muslim perceptions through their adoption of hipster styles and pastimes. Exploring the Mipster trend globally, we don’t want you to miss this recreation of Pharrell’s “Happy” video, specifically showcasing modern-day Muslims in Britain. The Honest Policy, a group for global empowerment and change, captured the footage through contributions from a variety of people across the country.
 
3. Memories in a Digital Time Capsule
Hyper-nostalgia mobile apps are flooding the market, targeting Millennial audiences who want to put the past in the present and easily store newly made memories. Don’t miss out on Saga, a Seattle startup app that lets users share multiple streams of data at once. For example, after a vacation users can "bundle" their location tags and share the bundle with friends as a map of their experience. Data can be shared selectively to…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without the food and getting ready for Black Friday” –Female, 19, CA

Brands are continuing to learn that labeling toys by gender is not always ok with the next generation. In the latest case, a photo of seven-year-old little girl reacting to a sign saying a superhero clock was a “fun gift for boys” has gone viral. The girl is a big fan of superheroes and told her mother the brand was “being stupid” by labeling a product she liked in that way—but really her facial expression tells the whole story. In reaction to the photo, Tesco has taken down gendered toy signs from all of its stores. (The Daily Dot)

Teaching kids about danger today involves a whole that parents probably didn’t have to contend with when they were growing up. Between privacy online and the dangers of technology overload, they could use a little help, and PBS Kids has launched a new show with exactly that goal. Ruff Ruffman: Humble Media Genius is a new animated series starring a “manic” dog (Ruff) who tackles a new technological issue in each episode. The show is streaming on the PBS Kids website and YouTube, and plans to continuously evolve to “keep pace with kids’ changing media usage.” (Fast Company)

44% of Millennials 21-27-years-old have never drank a Budweiser, and the brand is shifting to try and attract this new generation of consumers. New TV spots will drop the traditional Clydesdales and instead feature young people, and a new campaign will also involve music festival partnerships, and parties in college towns featuring Jay Z. But some are warning that to really appeal to Millennials, Budweiser shouldn’t look like they’re trying too hard. (TimePR Newser)

According to a report from BuzzFeed, more than 50% of Millennials 18-34-years-old read the site each month, which makes their reach higher than many TV networks, including CBS, NBC, FX, Comedy Central, MTV, and AMC. The report indicates that “BuzzFeed is definitely becoming a media destination among young people — not just a habitual browse,” and with the site continuing to build their video content, they could rival TV in even more ways. (Business Insider)

Tech is often blamed for isolating young users and disrupting real social connections. But interestingly, a recent study has found that teen loneliness actually declined between 1978 and 2009, which means today’s teens could actually be less lonely than their parents were. The study also found that though young people today are more independent, and less likely to join clubs, “they have less need for feeling attached to a large group of friends.” (CNN)

On an average day, 33% of Millennials spend money on fast food/take out, 26% spend on groceries, and 14% spend on dining out. Our tracked data trends have all the stats on that and more, thanks to our monthly survey of 1000 13-32-year-old Millennials nationwide. Our Silver and Gold subscribers get access to regularly updated charts following average daily spend and items purchased, with spending broken out by age and gender. We do the heavy data lifting for you, and we’re constantly adding new data to our trends. (Ypulse)

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