A Different Side of Global Millennials: The Friday Don’t Miss List

This week we're following up with content you might have missed in maker culture, global trends, tech, and the workplace with a Millennial focused eye.

1. Mommy on the Job? Maybe Not
In our Essentials this week, we let you know about brands like PepsiCo and LinkedIn that are incorporating Millennials’ parents into the hiring process, but warned that “bring-your-parents-to-work-day” may not be fun for everyone. Don’t miss the reactions to the original article that serve to either explain or mock this new trend. Millennials are indeed closer to their parents than generations before them, and while sociological changes are underway as they fill the workforce, older generations can’t help but scoff at the implications of helicopter parenting in the workplace.
 
2.  A Different Side of Global Millennials
This week’s guest post from JWT MENA introduced you to the Mipsterz—a sub-culture of Millennial Muslims who are challenging long-held Muslim perceptions through their adoption of hipster styles and pastimes. Exploring the Mipster trend globally, we don’t want you to miss this recreation of Pharrell’s “Happy” video, specifically showcasing modern-day Muslims in Britain. The Honest Policy, a group for global empowerment and change, captured the footage through contributions from a variety of people across the country.
 
3. Memories in a Digital Time Capsule
Hyper-nostalgia mobile apps are flooding the market, targeting Millennial audiences who want to put the past in the present and easily store newly made memories. Don’t miss out on Saga, a Seattle startup app that lets users share multiple streams of data at once. For example, after a vacation users can "bundle" their location tags and share the bundle with friends as a map of their experience. Data can be shared selectively to…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: “If I played the lottery tomorrow and won $100,000,000 I would save most of it, donate some of it. And I'd buy my dad a boat, because I promised I'd buy him one if I was ever a millionaire.” –Female, 15, WA

This week, celebrity Photoshopping was debated online when fans criticized Beyoncé for posting an Instagram picture that looked altered to make her look slimmer. The star (and others) have been accused of using Photoshop or other image-fixing apps on social media photos before, a practice that many feel contributes to young female fans’ body issues, and does not align with the imperfection embracing and authenticity that so many young consumers expect. (BuzzFeed)

The Cartoon Network has launched an anti-bullying campaign called “I Speak Up” to encourage kids who have been bullied to reach out to trusted adults. Viewers are being encouraged to submit videos (with the permission of their parent or guardian) to share the anti-bullying message, and some of those videos will be featured in the campaign online and on TV. Visitors to the Speak Up website can also take a pledge to stop bullying, and earn special badges while playing Cartoon Network games. (PR Newser)

Young consumers are screen multitaskers, and second screen use while watching TV is a norm—but it’s not always clear to brands how they should engage in that behavior, and just throwing a hashtag on the screen isn’t going to cut it. Now Twitter says that studios and networks that live-tweet their popular programming (post and respond to viewers while the show is happening) can “dramatically boost followers and Twitter mentions” and even bump up TV ratings. (Recode)

YouTube is coming to the big screen. The digital comedy duo who create SMOSH, a channel with 30 million subscribers, has created a movie that will be distributed by Lionsgate. The movie is being described as a “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventurefor 2014” and will star a slew of other YouTube stars. The news is another example of traditional media embracing YouTube to entice young consumers, and the mainstreaming of the site’s stars. (Fast Company)

New research has found that across all grade levels and subjects, girls get better grades than male students—around the globe. The results have caused some to wonder if schools are “set up to favor the way girls learn and trip up boys.” Male students might be less able to self-discipline themselves, a key ingredient to doing well in classes, which means that the way education is structured plays into their weaknesses. (The Atlantic

Have some lingering questions about Millennials that you need answered for an upcoming meeting? That’s what Ypulse is here for. Silver and Gold subscribers have access to Ypulse's trend and Millennial experts for quick, personalized feedback on any topic. After each insights article, subscribers can submit questions and requests directly to our experts and receive instant responses. (Ypulse)

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