3 Millennial Myths Debunked

We hear a lot about Millennials during our daily research on the generation. And as we’ve said before, there are a lot of misconceptions and myths out there. From labeling them as slacktivists (not necessarily true) to saying they’re the worst generation in the workplace, there are many stories about Millennials that just don’t hold up when you look a little deeper. Here are three common myths about Millennials that are probably just not true:

 

 

 

 


Myth #1: Hookup Culture Killed Dating! 
Hookup culture is a favorite topic of a certain segment of those writing about Millennials. The common story goes: Millennials (especially those in college) are eschewing relationships to instead hookup with everyone they can, and dating is dead because of the rise of hookups, leaving a generation devoid of intimacy and real relationships. But not so fast! New research has found that hookup culture is probably a myth, and Millennials aren’t having any more sex with more partners than previous generations. (Information which Millennials themselves are probably not surprised to hear.) While Millennials might have different expectations about and definitions of long term relationships in their 20s, their actual behavior doesn’t match up with the “great hookup culture scare” of the past few years.

Myth #2: Young People Can’t Stop Sexting on Snapchat! 
The sexting myth goes hand in hand with the hookup myth, and makes us wonder if older generations just like to think that younger ones are sex-crazed because it’s fun to talk about. Thanks to some well-publicized teen sexting scandals, the conversation around young people and sexting has been one of fear and shock. While we're not downplaying the experiences of some teen sexters as real and sometimes damaging, the phenomena is not exactly…

 
 
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Millennial News Feed

Quote of the Day: "A benefit of unplugging is getting a more personal view of the world back. (Social media tends to distort your perception to bend to what others are thinking/feeling/saying/doing.)” —Female, 25, MN

Liam Matthews, a teenager from New Zealand, has grown his Instagram following from under 150,000 to over 1.5 million in the course of a year by combining celebrity glamour shots with DIY cross-dressing. His profile documents his attempts to mimic the looks of young female celebrities using fabric scraps, an array of wigs, and strategically placed ramen noodles. Sticking to side-by-side comparison images and a focus on the most popular young celebrities, Matthews has struck a format that makes imitation the sincerest form of humor. (Uproxx)

Every brand seem to want their own hashtag catchphrase, but authenticity and sheer common sense are being compromised by some in pursuit of the viral tag. Over the course of 12 hours, one writer noticed 39 distinct hashtags, including #unseenacne for Neutrogena which was deemed “#FreakingGross” by one Twitter user and a #sorrynotsorry copycat from Equinox coined #preapologize. While the latter has seen 1.2 million impressions (many from the company and its employees), some have been so confused by the wording that they had to ask Equinox directly what it was supposed to mean. (WSJ)

Good thing OKCupid users aren’t raising much alarm over recent experiments conducted on them, because the company is unapologetic. The three experiments that faked matchmaking results and manipulated conversations were detailed in full on OKCupid’s trends blog under the title "We Experiment on Human Beings!" Internet skeptical Millennials are used to their data being used behind-the-scenes, and may not have as much issue with OKCupid as other tests made public (like those from Facebook) because “experimentation in dating is part of the process” to improve matches. (NYT

Transparency communication is the new buzzword at Johnson & Johnson who has started a movement to win over Millennial moms. The first ad in the planned 40-plus series announces that they will remove controversial ingredients from their products and reminds viewers that J&J employees are parents themselves, having them write 1,000 promises to reflect the company's dedication to change. Future video series will serve to debunk myths, educate new parents, and connect them through social media forums. (AdAge)

A Disney princess clothing collection from BlackMilk, featuring Snow White bomber jackets, mermaid leggings, and Hakuna Matata skater skirts, is selling out. Mind you, this collection is made for adult females. We took a look at what happens when the princesses grow up, and discovered that Millennials are eager to co-opt Disney imagery and update it to fit with their current lifestyles. Though some don't appreciate their favorite animations being slapped onto skintight clothing, the bold and graphic prints clearly appeal to some and would probably make for some unique rave gear. (Jezebel)

Quote of the Day: “In the future, I'd like to pay off my student loans and not starve or get evicted. A stable job would be nice.” –Male, 26, PA

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