Lifeline: Risky Business

  • May 31st, 2012
  • ypulse

Lifeline: Risky BusinessIntroducing Ypulse's new syndicated subscription service, Lifeline!

Lifeline is simple: a feed of Millennial insights into your organization. More in-depth than our Daily Update, the annual subscription includes 10 topical deep dive reports delivered throughout the year (including an interactive webinar presentation of each), consulting hours with our team of experts, as well as question units to be run in our omnibus tools. Each report also includes full data tables from the 1,500 13-34s we poll. These reports are going to cover a broad range of key industry categories and topics throughout the year — from Food Culture to Politics to Entertainment — always positioned to look at how businesses are evolving to reflect this unique generation of youth, the Millennials.

Though known to be a risk-averse generation, we took a close look at how Millennials' are interfacing with traditionally risky teen behavior such as illegal activities, alcohol, drugs, and sex.

Perhaps the greatest risk Millennials take — knowing the danger involved — is texting while driving. Despite the number of public service campaigns targeting young drivers, more than a third use their phones to text or go online while behind the wheel. Although they’re a risk-averse generation, the allure of their phones is too great for Gen Y. The messages about the dangers of smoking and drugs that Millennials heard while growing up seem to have gotten through. As a result, very few are smokers, and under 18s particularly eschew smoking. Very few use drugs. Marijuana, however, is a slightly different story. Most don’t see it as a serious drug, so they’re far more likely to have tried it than other, harder drugs.

Millennials also don’t think drinking, including underage drinking, is a big deal. Their parents and the media treat it casually — it is depicted in their favorite TV shows and movies. In some cases, their parents (“peerents”) are the ones who introduce them to drinking, allowing them to drink under their supervision. Even if the law says they should be 21, most Millennials have sampled a wide variety of alcoholic drinks. On average, they start drinking, unsupervised, at age 17.

To download the report — free until June 30! — visit the Ypulse store. Visit the Ypulse Research page to learn more about the Lifeline subscription.

Spending On Licensed Products And Apparel For Kids Is Up

  • May 31st, 2012
  • npd group

According to The NPD Group’s "Kids Industry Data Service" report, of the $24 billion spent on products for kids from birth to 14 years of age in the first quarter of 2012, apparel/accessories experienced the most growth, increasing 1.3 percent to over $8.9 billion versus Q1 2011. Other categories showing increases included arts & crafts, consumer electronics, health & beauty, and sporting goods. While sales of apparel/accessories experienced the most growth among kids, it was one of the categories that kids were least likely to ask for. Video game software, video game hardware, and consumer electronics were categories that ranked as some of the highest for products requested by the child. Sales of licensed products for kids experienced an increase in Q1 2012, from $5.6 billion to $5.8 billion, while non-licensed products saw a slight decline to $18 billion versus $18.1 billion generated during the same time period last year. The franchises experiencing the most growth for kids included (in alphabetical order) Cars: The Movie, Hello Kitty & Friends, Mickey and Friends, and Transformers.

For more information, see the press release.

Young Trendsetters Define Hi-Low Subcultures In Fashion And More

  • May 31st, 2012
  • label networks

Label Networks Youth Culture Study Spring 2012Label Networks’ "12th Annual Spring Youth Culture Study" reveals key findings that leave little doubt that a new generation has come into their own, creating a fresh set of trends within the U.S. youth landscape in spending patterns, shopping habits, use of social media, communication patterns, and changes in brand preferences in fashion, footwear, music, sports, and relevant lifestyle associations. The DIY aesthetics of more than 56 million people between the ages of 13-25-years-old, born from a tech-savvy generation before them, has flipped traditional business models of what was once consider fluid and popular just 5 years ago. A new framework has been established coming from the bottom-up rather than the top-down. First comes the realization that a large portion of today’s youth culture has spent their entire teens living in a recession. Not only are they pushing the speed of change as the inherent trendsetters in technology, but via the ripple effects of a global economy in hardship, they have a retrospective shadow of a “savings” culture. The dichotomy of the new and old, fast-fashion low-cost trendiness and slow-fashion high-cost craftivism, as an example, is a part of the unique make-up of their characteristic. It’s not only redefining shopping and spending patterns, but creating new hi-low subcultures in music, sports, communication, future concerns, technology, gaming, and lifestyle patterns.

For more information, visit the website.

Digital Life Trumps Real Life For Gen Z

  • May 31st, 2012
  • jwt

JWT Gen Z Digital In Their DNA“Gen Z: Digital in Their DNA” report from JWT provides a snapshot of the generation that follows Millennials by focusing on their digital habits: how they use connected devices to socialize, spend, shop, and more. We also report on how their parents feel about these habits and what this means for marketers. Among the findings is that for Gen Z, digital connections trump money, music, movies, and more. Digital connection is essential. As many as 90% of young American and British respondents would be reluctant to give up their Internet connection (vs. 78% who said the same for their mobile phone, and 76% for texting friends). Overall, Internet connections, mobile phones, and the ability to text friends are valued more highly than allowance money and various material goods, and significantly more highly than real-world activities like going to the movies or eating out. More than half of Gen Z respondents say it’s easier to chat with friends digitally, or more convenient. And significant percentages prefer socializing online — around 4 in 10 are more comfortable talking to people online than in real life and find it more fun.

For more information, visit the website.

Millennials Get Their Music Fix Online

  • April 23rd, 2012
  • npd group

Online radio is the fastest growing music listening option among U.S. consumers, according to NPD Group’s “Annual Music Study.” In 2011, 43 percent of U.S. Web users chose to listen to music via Pandora, Slacker, Yahoo! Music, and other online radio options, which is 9 percentage points higher than the previous year. At the same time listening to music on AM/FM radio and CD listening stayed relatively steady. Listening to free online radio is most popular among young adults age 18 to 25, and strong listener growth is also occurring among the 36- to 50-year-old age segment. Although consumers are overwhelmingly opting for free ad-supported online radio options, consumers’ conversion to paid versions of online, on-demand radio remains low. Cost: Call for information.

For more information, read the press release.

Teen Spending Makes A Recovery

  • April 23rd, 2012
  • piper jaffray

 

Piper Jaffray releases its 23rd semi-annual “Taking Stock With Teens” survey, which indicates improving discretionary spending across multiple categories for both upper- and average-income teens. The results provide confirmation that we are in the early stages of a clearly defined discretionary spending cycle. The survey offers key findings in fashion, beauty and personal care, restaurants, digital media and video game categories. Double-digit increases in fashion spending represent the first recorded since the 2003/2004 surveys, when teens across income levels indicated a similar meaningful propensity to spend on the fashion category. While strength in spending was broad-based across categories, spending by male teens in fashion was the highest, a trend which has historically been indicative of a multi-year, dual-gender fashion spending recovery. Teen spending on food and restaurants is at or near the highest level since early-2000. Teen spending on portable devices continues to accelerate. They are also increasingly receptive to downloading games, accessing social networks and playing games on smartphones and tablets. Cost: Call for information.

For more information, read the press release.

Millennials Moving In With Parents

  • April 23rd, 2012
  • pew research center

More than three-quarters of young adults ages 25 to 34 who have moved back home with their families during the Great Recession and the troubled economic years that followed say they’re satisfied with their living arrangements and upbeat about their future finances, according to the report “The Boomerang Generation” from Pew Social & Demographic Trends. Those arrangements have benefited their parents as well: almost half of boomerang children say they have paid rent and almost nine-in-ten have helped with household expenses. One reason young adults who are living with their parents may be relatively upbeat about their situation is that this has become such a widespread phenomenon. Among adults ages 25 to 34, 61% say they have friends or family members who have moved back in with their parents over the past few years because of economic conditions. Furthermore, three-in-ten parents of adult children (29%) report that a child of theirs has moved back in with them in the past few years because of the economy. Cost: Free.

For more information, visit the website.

Education, Employment, Finance

  • April 23rd, 2012
  • ypulse

Ypulse Report: Education, Employment & FinanceA majority of Millennials have jobs, even those who also go to school. For high schoolers, money matters most when accepting a job, whereas collegians place the most importance on the personal satisfaction they get from the job. Non-students value the work experience they’ll earn, according to Ypulse. Most Millennials say their job hunt has been much more difficult than they expected. Many are settling for what they can get because finding a “good” or “interesting” job is tough. They aren’t happy about settling; they would prefer to work on their passions rather than for a paycheck, but they’re realistic about having to pay bills and gain work experience. Still, despite the tough economy, they’re confident that they’ll eventually get to work at their dream job and accomplish their professional goals before they retire.

Millennials are also conflicted about college. They feel that they’re expected to get a degree, and most plan to do so, as well as complete a graduate or professional degree. But they’re beginning to question if the cost of college is worth it overall. Speaking of money, most Millennials use financial services, even those under age 18. Younger Millennials tend to rely on cash to pay for the things they buy, with only a few using debit or credit cards. Older Millennials are much less likely to use cash, making most of their purchases with debit cards. Those aged 18 and older have and use a variety of financial services, and most prefer to perform their banking transactions online. Although Millennials under 18 don’t own many financial products themselves, most use financial services, preferring to perform transactions with a teller or via an ATM. Cost: $2,000.

You can purchase this report in the Ypulse Store.

Instilling Values Of Volunteering

  • February 29th, 2012
  • scholastic and handson network

Clifford Be BigThe results of a new research study, “It Starts with Character: Inspiring Kids & Teens to Volunteer” from Scholastic and HandsOn Network, found that kids and teens who have more exposure to character-building skills, such as sharing, being kind, and helping others, are more likely to volunteer in their communities, and with greater frequency. The study also found that parents and teachers say that media (TV, film, books, magazines, games, apps, and Internet) can play an important role in communicating the value of character education. The study coincides with the fourth annual ‘Clifford BE BIG in Your Community’ campaign, designed to inspire engagement in service and volunteerism.

For more information, access the PDF of the report.

Saving For Schooling

  • February 29th, 2012
  • college savings foundation

College Savings FoundationA new survey of 16- and 17-year olds reveals a widening gap between high school students’ plans for funding college and their ability to do so, according to the College Savings Foundation. Despite the fact that an overwhelming majority of students — 78% — said it was their responsibility to pay for at least part of their college education, both the data and the commentary of respondents to the College Savings Foundation’s third annual “How Youth Plan to Fund College” survey show that students are worried and confused about how to accomplish this.

For more information, visit the website.

Beauty Basics For Younger Faces

  • February 29th, 2012
  • mintel

Mintel Teen & Tween BeautyThe teen and tween beauty market has always straddled the fence between attracting new users to the category with the hope of forming life-long habits, and providing age-appropriate products, according to Mintel. Parents continue to battle the KGOY (kids growing older younger) phenomenon, but young girls are facing intense pressure from both the media (and sometimes Mother Nature) to adopt adult behaviors before they’re ready. The beauty industry has waged a type of “tween creep” where girls as young as 7 or 8 are considered fair game for tween products. For brands looking to initiate long-term relationships with these young users, they must create product lines that grow with these girls as they mature or they’ll be abandoned as “too childish” which is a death sentence for cosmetics hoping to see the light of the high school hallways.

For more information, visit the website.

New Ypulse Report: Technology

  • February 29th, 2012
  • ypulse
 

The technology that students own is improving, according to Ypulse. They’re trading in their old devices for newer, more powerful models; for example, most students have upgraded their standard cell phones and now carry smartphones. They’re also tossing aside devices that have outlived their utility, such as digital cameras, because that functionality is built into their phones. Then there’s the new technology students can’t wait to get their hands on. The number of Millennials who own iPads, Nook Tablets, Kindle Fires, and other types of tablets jumped significantly between 2011 and 2012, but those who don’t have a tablet yet want one badly. Apple is still the most desired brand among students, for both smartphones and tablets, though they can’t always afford Apple’s pricier products. Collegians (guys in particular) are more likely than high schoolers to have iPhones and iPads. Being older, they have their own incomes and the freedom to make their own purchase decisions, whereas high schoolers are still reliant on their parents to pay and have to earn their parents’ trust that they’ll take care of their expensive “toys.”

The most common apps students have on their devices are games and social media. Social media pervades every aspect of students’ lives. Facebook is still the dominant network, but in the past year, several niche networks — Pinterest, Instagram, and Foursquare — are gaining a devoted following, each one filling different social needs. Meanwhile, Twitter has become a mainstream network, with more than half of Millennials tweeting. 

You can purchase this report in the Ypulse Store.

 


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